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Technical resources for implementing the measurement, reporting and verification arrangements under the Convention and the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement.
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CGE reinforces committment to its mandate and convenes an ad-hoc virtual meeting to assess the potential impact of COVID-19 on its 2020 workplan.
11/05/2020 13:07No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu11/05/2020 14:0711.05.2020

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), mandated to provide technical support and advice to developing countries improve their capacities to implement the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the ETF under the Paris Agreement has underlined its commitment to deliver its mandate and work despite the COVID-19 pandemic.  To this extent,  The CGE convened an ad-hoc virtual meeting on 14 April 2020 from 14:30 – 16:30 CET (Bonn time) to assess the potential impact of on-going worldwide effects of COVID-19 on its 2020 work plan and discussed how the potential impacts could be managed. The CGE will continue assessing such potential impacts as the situation unfolds and take necessary measures to ensure successful implementation of its workplan.

This level of commitment is critically important given that the current MRV system is set to transition to ETF under the Paris Agreement, which will increasingly require more detailed reporting by all countries. Learn more about the CGE continued commitment here and  the adjustments made to its 2020 workplan in the light of COVID-19 is here.
  
The UNFCCC secretariat conducts virtual review of 16 developed country Party BRs.
11/05/2020 12:26No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu11/05/2020 12:2611.05.2020

Determined to continue its crucial mandated work even during the COVID-19 pandemic, the UN Climate Change secretariat conducted a virtual review of the climate policy and climate action reports from 16 developed country Parties in March and April 2020.

The virtual review included Biennial Reports from Austria, Canada, France, Greece, Ireland, Spain, Australia, Germany, Finland, the EU, Italy, Netherlands, Norway Portugal, Sweden and Switzerland and was conducted by 67 international experts, who performed their function as reviewers.
The virtual review found that due to climate policies and actions implemented, and based on 2017 factual greenhouse gas emissions data, almost all of the 16 developed countries are reaching their 2020 climate targets. The UN Climate Change will publish reports on the review in due course. Learn more about the review here.
  
The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), has rolled out some of the planned capacity building initiatives for 2020 despite the COVID-19 crisis
11/05/2020 11:41No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu11/05/2020 11:4111.05.2020

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), an expert group under the Convention and the Paris Agreement mandated to provide technical support and advice to developing countries on MRV and transparency has rolled out some of the planned capacity building initiatives for 2020 despite the COVID-19 crisis.

The CGE planned a number of capacity building initiatives for its 2020 workplan such as regional webinar training sessions on transitioning from the revised 1996 to 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories, regional webinar trainings on ICTU and NDC progress tracking; training session on institutional arrangement to support MRV and ETF process. To this extent the CGE has already conducted webinars on transitioning from the revised 1996 to 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories for the Asia-Pacific region, which was conducted on 22 April 2020. A total of 44 experts attended the webinar and this presents an example of concrete effort by the CGE to assist developing countries enhance their technical capacity to prepare for and implement reporting requirement under the Convention and Paris Agreement.
Learn more about the webinar by following the presentations, the recordings and the initial questions and answers during the webinar.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Text Box: The 3rd Consultative Group of Experts Meeting held on 18 to 19 February 2020 in Bonn
 
 
  
​The Consultative Group of Experts held its 3rd Meeting from 18 to 19 February 2020 in Bonn, Germany.
11/05/2020 10:45No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu11/05/2020 10:5511.05.2020

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), mandated to provide technical support and advice to developing countries to improve capacities to implement the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the ETF under the Paris Agreement, held its 3rd Meeting from 18 to 19 February 2020 in Bonn, Germany. To this end, the CGE formulated its Vision, Mission statement and Strategic objectives to guide its work up to 2026. The CGE’s Vision is to comprehensively achieve its mandate of assisting developing country Parties improve their capacities to implement the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the ETF under the Paris Agreement in a timely and sustainable manner.  The CGE’s Mission Statement seeks to provide targeted technical support and advice, consistent with its mandate, to developing country Parties that responds to their technical assistance needs to implement, in a timely manner, the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement, including putting in place sustainable institutional arrangements and data management systems.

  
The CGE successfully held its 2nd Pilot Informal Forum at COP 25, on on on institutionalization of data management system.  Country experiences were shared by Thailand, Indonesia and Australia
20/12/2019 14:44No presence informationJustice Khumela20/12/2019 14:4420.12.2019

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) successfully held its 2nd Pilot Informal Forum on the margins of the twenty-fifth session of UN Climate Change Conference (COP 25). The CGE collaborated with the Paris Committee on Capacity-Building (PCCB) and was organized as part of the “Transparency Day” at the Capacity-building Hub on 5 December 2019. The focus of the second pilot informal forum was on institutionalization of data management system.
The 2nd forum convened with opening statements by the Chair of the CGE, Mr. Gervais Ludovic Itsoua Madzous and Co-Chair of the PCCB, Ms. Marzena Chodor, and introductory remarks by the Chair of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation, Mr. Emmanuel Dumisani Dlamini, the Deputy Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC secretariat, Mr. Ovais Sarmad and COP25 Presidency, Ms. Carolina Urmeneta.
To set the scene, the CGE Chair, Mr. Itsoua Madzous, provided an overview of the work that the CGE undertook in 2019 to develop technical capacity of developing countries to institutionalize data management for their national GHG inventories. He also presented the key findings from the assessment undertaken this year by the CGE to better understand the existing and emerging constraints, needs and gaps in relation to implementing the existing measurement, reporting and verification arrangements under the Convention and preparing for the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement.
Country experiences and lessons learned to institutionalize data management systems were presented by Indonesia, Mr. Joko Prihatno and Australia, Mr. Aaron Kirby. They provided concrete examples of how data management is institutionalized through live demonstrations of their data management systems. They also shared their experiences and lessons learned in developing and maintaining such systems, including key success factors that benefited the process of institutionalizing data management, key challenges and constraints faced in the process, and how the countries overcame them and what remains to be addressed. The data management systems that were demonstrated in the forum included:
 
-       Indonesia: SIGN-SMART (a web-based GHG data management system) and SRN or National Public Registry System (a web-based data management system for tracking mitigation and adaptation actions and support);
      
In addition, Thailand who has recently set up their GHG inventory system (TGEIS) in collaboration with Australia, also shared their experiences.
In the discussion and exchange session, participants shared experiences and lessons learned, which included:  
 
·      How putting in place a national data management system and institutionalizing data collection and management led to benefits beyond reporting under the UNFCCC process. The data management system can result in a robust data and flexibility in terms of archiving and documentation of the data. Further, it helps to communicate with broader stakeholders, which then contributes to getting support on MRV process.
 
·      Governance system and leadership, including legal and regulatory frameworks that mandate regular reporting and establishment of national data management system, was identified as key success factors. It is vital not only for setting up the national data management system, but for its operationalization, especially when there is lack of readiness or willingness of sectoral agencies and various levels of stakeholders (i.e. local and/or provincial levels) to use the established data management system and provide the required input data.
 
·      In terms of the design of the national data management system, it is important to incorporate the system into a broader national inventory plan. In case a country has separate sectoral data collection/reporting systems, it is important to integrate them into the national system and ensure the consistent flow of data and information without duplicative work.
 
 
If you missed the event, the presentations can be obtained here.
Keep following our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
 
 
  
Presenters at the side-event. From left to right:  government of Lebanon (Ms. Yara Daou Chalfoun); the government of Chile (Mr. Richard Martinez Caro); GEF (Ms. Milena Gonzalez Vasquez); Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (Mr. Henning Wuester); UNFCCC secretariat (Mr. William Agyemang-Bonsu); UNEP/UNDP GSP (Mr. Damiano Borgogno); and Global Green Growth Institute (Mr. Gebru Jember Endalew).
18/12/2019 15:45No presence informationJustice Khumela18/12/2019 15:4518.12.2019

An event showcasing the efforts, including experiences and lessons learned, of Chile and Lebanon to strengthen their institutional arrangements and governance structures to support implementation of the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) was held on 5 December 2019 on the margins of 25th session of the Conference of the Parties in Madrid, Spain.  The event also included representatives from international agencies and programmes (Initiative for Climate Action Transparency, Joint UN Environment/UNDP Global Support Programme, the Global Environment Facility and Global Green Growth Institute) who are actively involved in supporting developing countries to share their perspective, including experiences and lessons learned, and support opportunities available from them.
The modalities, procedures and guidelines (MPGs) adopted in Katowice, provide the operational details for the ETF.  The MPGs are applicable to all Parties to the Paris Agreement with flexibility to those developing country Parties that need it in the light of their capacities. This is a significant shift in the UNFCCC process as the ETF builds on and enhances the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention, including the need to report information on climate action and support biennially. This necessitates having in place sustainable and functional national institutional arrangements.  Recognizing such a need, a number of developing country Parties are starting to enhance their efforts to improve their institutional arrangements with support from international community.
Lebanon shared their experience of how they built their institutional arrangements for reporting over time as they delivered four national communications and three BURs.  They encountered challenges with respect to institutionalizing data collection; addressing data gaps, and undertaking quality control and quality assurance measures to validate the data and the reports produced.  They started to address these by piloting a data sharing agreement between the Ministry of Environment and another ministry and thereafter expanded the approach to include other ministries.  They highlighted that stakeholder involvement is key.  Further, building human resource capacity within the country helped stabilize the reporting process.
Over time, Chile was able to put in place two key institutional arrangements that supported them to produce three national communications and three BURs to date: the Inter-Ministerial Technical Team on Climate Change (ETICC) and the National GHG Inventory System of Chile (SNICHILE). The ETICC is a cross government body that includes experts from ministries and their other institutes, coordinated by Ministry of Environment.  Similarly, SNICHILE is a decentralized body that includes the Ministry of Energy and Agriculture and is coordinated by Ministry of Environment. Chile explained that in order to strengthen institutional arrangements over time, it is important to take stock of gaps, needs and constraints and to seek support. They currently have a Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT) project to strengthen their institutional arrangements for National Determined Contribution and ETF.
Other presenters shared an overview of the scope and depth of support provided to developing countries for effective participation in the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and in terms of preparedness for participation in the ETF.
The GEF shared information on the programming status of the CBIT. So far, 59 CBIT projects were approved to the total value of 91 million USD. Of these, 29 projects have begun implementation. 80% of CBIT projects aim to enhance institutional arrangements. The GEF said that a single body responsible for overall coordination and management of the climate change reporting process which is well-located within a government ministry and having sufficient capacity and authority to carry out its role was the key pillar around which further institutional strengthening could be achieved.
ICAT explained that its objective is to provide policymakers around the world with tools and support tailored to country-needs for enhanced transparency and to assess the effectiveness of their countrys climate policies and actions in line with the Paris Agreement. ICAT has published a road-map for establishing information systems for climate action and support to help countries set-up information systems to meet their climate change reporting needs. They highlighted that buy-in from stakeholders; drafting regulatory and procedural documents for the operationalization of the institutional framework for reporting; and developing an integrated data management system were key to setting up a robust system for reporting.
The Global Support Programme (GSP) jointly implemented by UN Environment and UNDP and funded by the GEF, discussed the support provided to some developing countries to strengthen the capacity of the single body responsible for overall coordination and management of the climate change reporting process. The GSP highlighted that high-level political buy-in was important to cement inter-ministerial coordination.
The Global Green Growth Institute said that it was important that countries move away from the project-based approach that does not improve institutional memory or build long term capacity within government to meet climate change reporting needs to more permanent institutional arrangements. This is especially so because the enhanced transparency framework and its MPGs have many more shall’’ (mandatory) requirements for preparing biennial transparency reports that will require a more robust reporting system. GGGI have successfully assisted few countries in doing exactly that.
 
If you missed the event, the presentations can be obtained here https://seors.unfccc.int/applications/seors/reports/events_list.html
Keep following our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
 
  
Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary, opens the 8th workshop of the Facilitative sharing of views
12/12/2019 11:38No presence informationJustice Khumela12/12/2019 11:3812.12.2019

UN Climate Change News, 11 December 2019 – At the UN Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Madrid, fifteen countries presented the latest information on their climate actions at events called the Facilitative Sharing of Views (FSV) and Multilateral Assessment (MA).   
 
Operating since 2014, the MA and FSV processes provide multilateral platforms for countries to share the latest information on their climate actions and engage in a constructive exchange of views. These processes play a crucial role in building trust among countries by enhancing the transparency of climate actions, thereby allowing countries to track progress of implementation and raise ambition levels.
 
In her opening remarks at the FSV workshop, UNFCCC Executive Secretary, Patricia Espinosa, said:
 
“It is becoming clearer than ever how transparency is central to increasing climate action. Ensuring data is shared openly is vital to our collective climate change efforts. When we see what is working in one country, we are more likely to try it in our own, if it’s applicable. This transparency directly helps inform governments as they increase levels of ambition to tackle climate change.”
 
Facilitative Sharing of Views
 
At the 8th session of the FSV workshop, five developing countries - Chile, Ghana, India, Malaysia and Saudi Arabia – shared their achievements and remaining challenges in climate action.
 
The latest FSV workshop demonstrated strengthened efforts by developing countries in addressing climate change. The discussion highlighted various policies and measures being actively implemented by developing countries, including carbon pricing, low-carbon electricity generation and sustainable forest management.  
 
Countries also noted that developing the biennial update report (BUR) and participating in the international consultation and analysis (ICA) have been beneficial to strengthen their capacity in tracking progress of mitigation actions and increase awareness. 
 
COP25 President and Minister of Environment of Chile, Carolina Schmidt, said: “Data and transparency are core elements for driving commitments and increasing ambition.” She also added: “The international consultation and analysis (ICA) and facilitative sharing of views (FSV) have particular importance not only to establish dialogue, but also to understand areas for improvement and approaches to overcome potential gaps.”
 
See here for highlights of the presentations made by these five countries.
 
 
Multilateral Assessment
 
Ten developed countries - Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus , Greece, Kazakhstan, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Portugal and Switzerland - shared their experiences with climate actions this week at the sessions on transparency in Madrid known as Multilateral Assessment.
        
 
Underlining the importance of the MA sessions, Kyriakos Psychas, Head of the Climate Change Department of the Ministry of Environment and Energy in Greece, said: “The Multilateral assessment process is a pillar for transparency and robust reporting.”
 
The sessions showcased the concrete climate actions developed Parties are taking to meet their 2020 emission reduction targets, which are crucial to achieving the goal of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.
 
The sessions showed how climate actions are improving as countries integrate lessons learned, and that the portfolio of climate actions continues to expand as countries progress towards meeting their strong political commitments for 2020 and beyond. 
 
Not only the 2020 climate action targets were on show; countries referred to their 2030 targets under the Paris Agreement, demonstrating that the short-term 2020 targets are essential stepping stones to reaching the mid- and longer-term targets.
 
Some countries also outlined their ambitious goals for carbon neutrality by 2050. For example, Portugal and Switzerland presented their 2050 net zero emissions targets. Eduardo Ferreira Santos, Head of the Department for Climate Change at the Portuguese Environment Agency said: “The next decade is crucial in terms of emissions reduction and climate policy and trajectory that puts us on track to 2050”. See video from Portugal here: http://bit.ly/2LM7Iww
        
Novel approaches to tackling transportation emissions were also presented, such as free public transit (Luxembourg) and consideration of including road fuel into emissions trading systems (Austria).
 
For more information, please visit http://unfccc.int/ICA and http://unfccc.int/IAR
  
5 December 2019, 18:00 - 20:00
26/11/2019 16:32No presence informationJustice Khumela03/12/2019 14:1026.11.2019

The enhanced transparency framework of the Paris Agreement (ETF) requires that all developing country Parties submit their biennial transparency repots, at the latest, by 31 December 2024. The availability and quality of the data will determine the credibility of the information provided. While most developing countries have experience, at least once, in compiling data for the preparation of their national greenhouse gas inventories, through their experience in preparing national communications (NCs) and in some cases the biennial update reports (BURs), constraints and challenges continue to exist.
 
Data-related challenges are the most prevalent challenges faced by developing countries.  These challenges fall in two broad categories: primary data collected and data management.  The challenges around the primary data collection stems from either lack of access to or unavailability of primary data or available data not in the suitable format or lack of human resource capacity or the technical infrastructure needed to support the data collection process.  Similar challenges associated with the data management are mainly due to lack of human resource capacity or the technical infrastructure for data management, quality control and quality assurance (QA/QC), documentation and archiving.
 
Recognizing these challenges, the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) will host its 2nd Pilot Informal Forum entitled “Institutionalizing data management system” on 5 December at COP 25. The event is being organized in collaboration with the Paris Committee on Capacity-Building and will be one of the events held at the Capacity-building Hub on the “Transparency day”.
 
The pilot forum is aimed at increasing awareness of the importance of institutionalizing GHG data management; promoting exchange of best practices, practical experiences and lessons learned in   institutionalizing GHG data management; and further improving understanding of constraints and challenges, and the depth and needs for further capacity-building efforts.
 
To set the scene, the CGE will present the findings from its assessment undertaken in 2019 to better understand the existing and emerging constraints, needs and gaps in relation to the existing MRV arrangements and the enhanced transparency framework. It will be followed by the presentations from Indonesia and Australia showcasing their success stories and lessons learned in establishing and institutionalizing their national GHG inventory systems.
 
 
Date: Thursday, 5 December 2019
Time: 18:00 – 20:00
Location: Capacity-building Hub
  
Figure 3: Number of nationally appropriate mitigation action entries in the registry by type
from 2013 to 2019
22/11/2019 16:39No presence informationJustice Khumela22/11/2019 16:3922.11.2019
 

UN Climate Change News, 20 November 2019 - The UNFCCC NAMA registry recorded an additional 13 NAMA (nationally appropriate mitigation action) entries in between 1 October 2018 and 30 September 2019, mostly seeking support for preparation and implementation of plans to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
 
NAMAs refer to any action that reduces emissions in developing countries and is prepared under the umbrella of a national governmental initiative. They can be policies directed at transformational change within an economic sector, or actions across sectors for a broader national focus.
 
As at 30 September 2019, the UNFCCC NAMA registry contained a total of 183 NAMAs seeking support for preparation or implementation or seeking recognition, representing an increase of 8 per cent since 2018.
 
Annual Report on Registry of NAMAs to Be Considered at COP25
 
The UNFCCC Secretariat has released the seventh annual report on the operation of the registry of nationally appropriate mitigation actions for consideration by the UNFCCC’s Conference of Parties (COP25) in Madrid, Spain in December 2019.
 
This report provides information on the operation of the registry in the reporting period (1 October 2018 to 30 September 2019) and in terms of the cumulative status of NAMA entries in the registry as at 30 September 2019.
 
The report highlights that Ecuador submitted the largest number of entries (5), followed by South Africa (3), Iran (2), Bangladesh (1), Dominican Republic (1) and Guatemala (1) in the reporting period. Of the 13 NAMA entries, 7 sought support for implementation, 1 sought support for preparation and 5 sought recognition. These NAMAs mostly targeted energy supply, agriculture, transport and infrastructure and residential and commercial buildings sectors and sought a total of USD 15.78 billion in international support
 
As in previous reporting periods, financial support made up the greatest share of international support sought (USD 15.7 billion), followed by capacity-building support (USD 62 million) and technological support (USD 14.5 million).
 
Latin American and Caribbean States recorded the most NAMA entries. However, the substantial number of NAMA entries recorded by African States, Asia-Pacific States, SIDS and the LDCs was particularly noteworthy.
 
On the international support being sought for NAMAs, the document reports a cumulative total of USD 31.5 billion in international support sought by all NAMA entries for implementing or preparing NAMAs. Financial support continued to make up the greatest share of international support sought (USD 29.5 billion), followed by technological support (USD 1.7 billion) and capacity-building support (USD 0.21 billion).
 
  
The workshop for Asia-Pacific and Eastern Europe, held in Siem Reap, Cambodia.
17/10/2019 16:14No presence informationJustice Khumela17/10/2019 16:1417.10.2019

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) conducted three regional hands-on training workshops in 2019 on institutionalization of data management for the national greenhouse gas inventory. The workshops were conducted for three regions: Africa; Latin America and the Caribbean; and Asia-Pacific and Eastern Europe.

The aim of the workshops was to enhance the technical capacity of national experts involved in the preparation of national communications, biennial update reports and national greenhouse gas inventories to institutionalize data management in their national institutional arrangements.
The workshops covered a wide variety of issues and problem areas to data that are among the most persistent challenges faced by developing countries in their implementation of the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and preparation for the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement. Data issues manifest in various ways – lack of availability of data that are consistent with the reporting guidelines, inaccessible data, lack of adequate data collection and management process and/or system.
 The workshops also introduced for the first time a pre-workshop webinar and homework exercise that allowed participants to already have basic knowledge of the topic prior to the workshop. In addition, the workshop provided an opportunity for experts to work on simulated cases, which equipped the participants with hands-on experience on handling cases.
Another key aspect of the workshops was creating a platform for collaboration and interacting with their peers, CGE members and other experts. This includes sharing of views, lessons learned and experience relating to institutional arrangements for data collection and data management processes, including commonly used techniques, approaches and tools. The participants also expressed interest in enhancing regional collaboration on the institutionalization of data for GHG inventories on the basis of similarities in national circumstances in the region, noting the potential for sharing best practices, resources and expertise with a view to overcoming common challenges.

In general, the workshops were successful in:

(a)          Familiarizing national experts with the process and methods for institutionalization of data management for the national GHG inventory;
(b)          Providing a platform for national experts from the same region to share experience and lessons learned;
(c)           Promoting networking among national experts;
(d)          Providing a platform for the CGE to interact with national experts and gain insight into relevant lessons learned, experience, constraints and challenges.
Some participants expressed their intention to use the training materials as a basis for training other national experts, enhancing existing institutional arrangements, furthering their knowledge of GHG inventory preparation and improving their terms of reference for hired experts and consultants.
Participants expressed interest in learning more about enhancing existing institutional arrangements to improve the collection, management and reporting of GHG inventory data, including incorporating GHG inventory component into the existing data collection and management systems and processes in sectors so that proper data for the inventory can be generated in a timely manner.
The workshops were attended by 106 experts from 91 developing country Parties. The CGE members from the respective regions also participated in these workshops, which allowed them to gain first-hand knowledge on the technical capacity of the national experts.
 
More information about the CGE can be found here:  https://unfccc.int/CGE
 Details about the workshop are available here: http://bit.ly/2nBlFoe
  
The Asia-Pacific Regional NDC Dialogue which took place at the Asia-Pacific Climate Week in Bangkok.
17/10/2019 14:36No presence informationJustice Khumela17/10/2019 14:3617.10.2019

A forum for peer-to-peer exchange on nationally determined contributions (NDC)
 
UN Climate Change in collaboration with the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and other partners have overseen three Regional Dialogues this year: Africa; Latin America and the Caribbean; and Asia-Pacific.
The Regional Dialogues are a series of regional workshops which were launched in 2014 to provide a forum for peer-to-peer exchange on the design of intended NDCs, before transitioning to address issues of the nationally determined contributions (NDC) preparation and implementation.
The goal of the dialogues is to increase momentum for more ambitious and accelerated climate action and for enhanced NDCs. In doing so, the events serve as a contribution to the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Action Summit which took place in September 2019 and for COP 25.
This year, the Regional Dialogues’ objectives were enhancing capacities to prepare to update their NDCs; to identify solutions to specific challenges countries are facing in implementing and enhancing their NDCs; to provide a forum for peer-to-peer learning and exchange of national experiences related to NDC implementation and enhancement; and to provide a platform for linking national/regional interests with the international NDC process, and for strengthening existing and/or establishing new partnerships and commitments for ambitious climate action that help meet the goals of the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda.
Africa Regional NDC Dialogue in Accra, Ghana, 18-19 March
The first Regional Dialogue of the year took place in Accra, Ghana from 18 to 19 March with 89 participants from 47 countries and 69 participants from partners and donors attending.
Latin America and Caribbean Regional NDC Dialogue in Salvador, Brazil, 19-20 August
The Regional Dialogue for Latin America and the Caribbean took place from 19 to 20 August in Salvador, Brazil with 77 participants from 25 countries and 71 participants from partners and donors.
Asia-Pacific Regional NDC Dialogue in Bangkok, Thailand, 2-3 September
The Asia-Pacific Regional NDC Dialogue was the last dialogue of the 2019 series and took place during the Asia-Pacific Climate Week in Bangkok, Thailand from 2 to 3 September.
115 participants from 37 countries and 64 participants from partners and donors attended the two-day dialogue.
  
The second training workshop in the series was organized for the African region, from 16 to 18 September, in Algiers, Algeria, with support from the Algerian Government and UNDP country office in Algeria. The training workshop gathered 47 national experts who are involved in the preparation of national GHG inventory from 37 countries in the region and technical resource persons from the Greenhouse Gas Management Institute.
02/10/2019 10:57No presence informationJustice Khumela02/10/2019 10:5702.10.2019

Building a sustainable national MRV system and moving towards the enhanced transparency framework.

Issues related to data are among the most persistent challenges faced by developing countries in their implementation of the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and preparation for the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement. Data issues manifest in various ways – lack of availability of data that are consistent with the reporting guidelines, inaccessible data, lack of adequate data collection and management process and/or system.
 
To help developing countries tackle data issues and enhance MRV efforts at the national level, the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) decided to focus its technical assistance and capacity-building activities for 2019 on data issues and organize a series of regional hands-on training workshops on institutionalization of data management for the national GHG inventory.
 
The second training workshop in the series was organized for the African region, from 16 to 18 September, in Algiers, Algeria, with support from the Algerian Government and UNDP country office in Algeria. The training workshop gathered 47 national experts who are involved in the preparation of national GHG inventory from 37 countries in the region and technical resource persons from the Greenhouse Gas Management Institute.
 
The training workshop addressed key elements required to ensure the sustainability of GHG inventory process, including system design, governance, quality data, documentation and archiving and stakeholder engagement. Designed as part of a 4-phase programme (pre-workshop webinar – homework – hands-on training workshop – post-workshop webinar), the training workshop provided opportunities for national experts to learn, test and practice a handful of techniques, approaches and tools.
 
The participants engaged in the hands-on exercises and group discussions with great passion and eager to deepen their knowledge and skills and prompted the exchange of experiences and lessons learned including concrete proposals that they could further take up to improve the national GHG inventory management system. The training workshop ended on a note of general satisfaction.
 
The last training workshop in the 2019 series is planned for the Asia-Pacific and Eastern European regions from 7 to 9 October 2019, in Siem Reap, Cambodia.
 
For more details on CGE training workshops 2019, see here.
For more information on CGE and its work plan for 2019, see here.
  
With the adoption of the Paris Agreement the and the Katowice Climate Package, the efforts of parties to further enhance the transparency of climate action and support will be increased significantly. This will be achieved through the enhanced transparency framework (ETF), established under the Paris Agreement, that builds on and enhanced the existing measurement, reporting and verification arrangements (MRV) under the Convention As a result, there is a wide acknowledgement by the global community that developing countries will require increased financial, technical and capacity-building support.
08/07/2019 15:51Laure Fouchecourt08/07/2019 15:5108.07.2019

Speakers from left to right: Henning Wuster (ICAT), Milena Gonzalez vasquez (GEF), Minyoung Kim (UNFCCC-GIR-CASTT), William Agyemang-Bonsu (UNFCCC Secretariat), John Christensen (UNEP DTU Partnership).

With the adoption of the Paris Agreement and the Katowice Climate Package, the efforts of Parties to further enhance the transpanrency of climate action and support will be increased significantly. This will be achieved through the enhanced transparency framework (ETF), established under the Paris Agreement, that builds on and enhanced the existing measurement, reporting and verification arrangements (MRV) under the Convention As a result, there is a wide acknowledgement by the global community that developing countries will require increased financial, technical and capacity-building support.
A side-event, in the form of a panel discussion, showcasing the support (financial, technical, and capacity-building) provided to developing countries for participation in the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the ETF  under the Paris Agreement, was held on Monday 24 June on the margins of June 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn.
The panel discussion, moderated by the UNFCCC secretariat, included a panel of experts involved actively in supporting developing countries in this area.  The experts provided their perspective of how countries can use the ETF as part of their efforts to implement and further develop their NDCs.  They also shared key lessons learned and best practices in ensuring that the support provided contributes to the sustainability of the national MRV arrangements and helps countries as they move towards implementing the ETF.
Ms. Milena Gonzalez Vasquez (Global Environment Facility) presented the financial and technical support opportunities made available through the GEF, including the Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency – a funding window established in response to the request from COP 21 and plans for support for preparation of biennial transparency reports. She highlighted that developing countries could submit projects that help strengthen and prioritize their capacity to implement the enhanced transparency framework. The CBIT database contains a publicly list of projects submitted to date. As of June 2019, 48 projects received US$74 million of CBIT funds, with 17 projects in the implementation phase.
Mr. Stanford Mwakasonda provided further details on the on-the-ground support provided through the GEF-funded Global Support Programme.  The programme, implemented jointly by UN Environment and UNDP, provides support to developing countries to meet their national communications and biennial update reports reporting needs. He emphasized that it is important for countries to establish a legal framework (an overarching climate change policy, strategy or act) that provides the basis for legally defining the role of stakeholders such as universities and national statistics offices can play in the national MRV system.
Ms. Minyoung Kim of the Greenhouse Gas inventory & Research Center of Korea (UNFCCC-GIR CASTT) described the specific support measure offered, in partnership with UNFCCC, to developing countries to build their expertise in establishing or improving their national GHG inventories. She explained that the training programme covers aspects such as the reporting and technical analysis process under the UNFCCC, GHG inventory compilation including sectoral GHG estimation methodologies and development of country-specific GHG emission factors
Mr. Henning Wuester described the country-tailored tools and support made available to policy-makers and national experts by the Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (ICAT)to assess the impacts of their climate policies and actions; to develop effective and ambitious climate policies; and to mobilize investment. He provided examples of the support initiatives they have undertaken for developing countries in the past for developing reporting capacity such as the development of sustainable land and land use indicators for the land use sector.
Mr. John Christensen highlighted the range of tools (legal, institutional, procedural and capacity-building) made available by the UNEP DTU Partnership to support developing countries build a national system for implementing the enhanced transparency framework.
The panellists explained that their webpages contain information on how to access their support offering and highlighted that tools and guidance documents are freely available on their websites. 
Follow our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
  
The Consultative Group of Expert (CGE), on the margins of the June 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn, Germany, organized a side-event to present its 2019 CGE work plan and also highlight how it is responding to the needs arising from the enhanced transparency framework.
08/07/2019 15:42Laure Fouchecourt08/07/2019 15:4208.07.2019

The Consultative Group of Expert (CGE), on the margins of the June 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn, Germany, organized a side-event to present its 2019 CGE work plan and also highlight how it is responding to the needs arising from the enhanced transparency framework.

The group invited few countries to present their experiences and lessons learned in the process of preparing their national communications (NC) and/or biennial update reports (BURs), and how they are building on from those experiences and lessons learned to prepare for the enhanced transparency framework (ETF).
The CGE Chair, Mr. Gervais Ludovic Istoua Madzou (Congo), presented the 2019 work plan of the CGE,  which addresses the capacity-building needs of developing countries in a more targeted and strategic manner, in order to  facilitate improved reporting of developing countries over time and support the implementation of the ETF under Article 13 of the Paris Agreement.
Since February 2019, as part of its work plan, the CGE has already launched several activities, such as a targeted survey to developing countries to better understand their needs for implementing the MRV arrangements and the ETF, a toolbox on institutional arrangements to support MRV/transparency of climate action and support, technical guide to prepare for the implementation of the ETF, and the regional hands-on training workshops on institutionalization data management for GHG inventories.
Bangladesh, Jamaica and South Africa shared their experiences and lessons learned on the existing MRV arrangements, and also provided an update on how efforts being undertaken nationally to prepare for the implementation of the ETF.
Jamaica has submitted its first Biennial Update Report (BUR) in 2016 which went through the technical analysis and Facilitative Sharing of Views (FSV) in the same year.  It submitted its third National Communication (NC) in 2018 and , In the context of preparing these reports, two key challenges were highlighted, which were limited technical and human capacity to complete the reports, and inability to disburse resources in original project timeframe. In order to address these challenges, Jamaica received technical and financial support through the United National Development Programme and the Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT). Despite these challenges, Jamaica plans to submit its second BUR and fourth NC in 2020-2022.  It also aims to put in place a robust national MRV system from 2021-2022.
Bangladesh submitted its third NC in 2018.  The presentation highlighted some of the challenges and lessons learned from the process of preparing this report.  Lack of reliable data and information consistent with the requirements of the IPCC 2006 guidelines, lack of institutional capacity and dependence on external experts, and issues to retain sectoral specialist that were trained in the process of preparing these reports were identified as some of the challenges it is facing currently. With a view to addressing these challenges, Bangladesh aims to establish data sharing arrangements at the national level, including a permanent structure at the department of environment which had the mandated to prepare the NCs and BURs. In order to prepare itself for the implementation of the ETF, Bangladesh will build on and enhance the existing institutional arrangement, and plans to use the guidelines and tools, which will be developed by CGE. Bangladesh called for an increased financial and technical support to institutionalize the proposed MRV arrangements, update its National Determined Contributions (NDCs), and prepare their first Biennial Transparency Report (BTR).
South Africa, one of the five countries that has submitted its third BUR, shared its experiences, challenges and lessons learned. With regard to challenges, the following were identified: limited number of and high turnover of key staff members, issues with data management, capacity constraints in using the national GHG inventory information management systems, lack of disaggregated data for the GHG reporting, and a non-centralized information system for climate finance. Efforts to address these challenges include: recruiting sector specialists to compile GHG inventory data, conducting capacity-building for key personnel, formalizing data collection processes, and developing a climate change tracking and evaluation system, which included tracking of climate finance. The presentation also highlighted how the National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reporting Regulations, published in April 2017, formalized the institutional arrangements to ensure consistent and sustainable data input for the GHG inventory. In order to prepare for the ETF, South Africa will continue using the 2006 IPCC guideline, and will set up higher tier methodologies for key categories in country specific emission factor. South Africa also provided a preliminary list of actions that it aims to undertake in its effort to prepare for the implementation of the ETF.
Follow our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
  
In the framework of the 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn, Germany, the secretariat held a special event on Wednesday 20 June, on the transparency framework showcasing the experience and lessons learned from the current measurement, reporting and verification system (MRV) to help implement the Enhanced Transparency Framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement.
21/06/2019 11:52Laure Fouchecourt21/06/2019 11:5221.06.2019
In the framework of the 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn, Germany, the secretariat held a special event on Wednesday 20 June, on the transparency framework showcasing the experience and lessons learned from the current measurement, reporting and verification system (MRV) to help implement the Enhanced Transparency Framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement.
 
Check the video on the event here
Learn more here
Visit the Mitigation and Transparency Exchange Facebook Page here
  
The CGE, has so far in 2016, conducted five thematic webinars, 3 on vulnerability and adaptation assessment, and 2 on mitigation assessment. These webinars are part of the groups its capacity-building initiatives. An additional four webinars are also being planned for 2016.
20/05/2016 09:29No presence informationRoberto Felix04/11/2019 09:2120.05.2016

The CGE, has so far in 2016, conducted five thematic webinars, 3 on vulnerability and adaptation assessment, and 2 on mitigation assessment. These webinars are part of the groups its capacity-building initiatives.  An additional four webinars are also being planned for 2016.

The topics for the vulnerability and adaptation assessment webinars focused on the framework for assessment, climate change scenarios, and water resources.  The mitigation webinars focused on the key steps to conduct a mitigation assessment, and the key mitigation challenges and barriers faced in the sector of energy supply.

A total of 174 persons participated in the three vulnerability and adaptation assessment webinars and 80 participated in two mitigation assessment webinars.  Participants included national government representatives, researchers, and technical specialists. The webinars allowed participants to learn and engage with experts remotely and to submit questions where experts provided detailed responses immediately. The presentations were also made available online to users.

In the last quarter of 2016, the CGE will organized webinars in in French and Spanish.  


More details will be provided closer to the webinar dates!

  
The UNFCCC Secretariat hosted The Africa Regional Workshop on the Building of Sustainable National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Management Systems, and the Use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories
20/05/2016 09:40No presence informationRoberto Felix22/08/2016 11:3120.05.2016

The UNFCCC Secretariat hosted The Africa Regional Workshop on the Building of Sustainable National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Management Systems, and the Use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories from 14 to 18 March in Maseru, Lesotho. The workshop was organized by the UNFCCC Secretariat in collaboration with the Technical Support Unit of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories and the Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention.

 

A total of 57 experts from 41 countries in the region attended the workshop. The participants primarily consisted of government officials involved in the preparation of national GHG inventories, including UNFCCC national focal points.

 

The workshop was the first of its kind from the UNFCCC Secretariat, offering training on the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for non-Annex I Parties. The workshop was organized following the 42nd Subsidiary Body for Implementation acknowledging the request from non-Annex I Parties for further technical support aimed at improving their domestic capacity to facilitate continuity in meeting reporting requirements through, among others, training on the use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National GHG Inventories, as well as building of sustainable national GHG inventory management systems.

 

Therefore, the workshop emphasized both the importance of establishing a national inventory management system to support the regular development and submission of national GHG gas inventories, and provided hands-on training on the 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories, including the IPCC inventory software. 

 

The workshop consisted of six sessions. The first session included a keynote address by the Honorable Minister Selibe Mochoboroane, Minister of Energy and   Meteorology (Lethotho), and the sharing of country experiences by representatives of Benin, South Africa, Swaziland, and Tunisia.

 

The second session focused on the key role of the national GHG inventory management system, including presentations and hands on materials to support the development of a national GHG inventory management system. This session concluded with a group discussion where participants shared their experiences in using the proposed templates.

 

Sessions three through five provided training on the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, including general guidance, reporting, and sectoral guidance. Following an overview of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, including differences between the Revised 1996 and the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, participants were introduced to the IPCC inventory software and Emission Factor Database. The IPCC 2006 Guidelines were presented by sector —Energy, Industrial Processes and Product Use, Waste, and Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use. For each sector, participants reviewed source/sink categories and methodologies, and completed a hands-on exercise using the IPCC inventory software. Participants then learned how to utilize the IPCC inventory software for compiling various components of a national GHG inventory.

 

The UNFCCC Secretariat is organizing similar workshops for the Latin America and Caribbean, and Asia Pacific and Eastern Europe regions, in June and September 2016, respectively. 

 

Presentations from the workshop are available on the UNFCCC website: http://unfccc.int/national_reports/non-annex_i_natcom/meetings/items/655.php

 

 ​

  
The Ministry of the Environment of Japan and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) convened, together with the Ministry of Environment, Green Development and Tourism of Mongolia, the “14th Workshop on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories in Asia (WGIA14)” from 26 to 28 July 2016 in Mongolia’s capital city, Ulaanbaatar.
25/08/2016 16:45No presence informationJoseph Peter Ndimu25/08/2016 16:5925.08.2016

The Ministry of the Environment of Japan and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) convened, together with the Ministry of Environment, Green Development and Tourism of Mongolia, the “14th Workshop on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories in Asia (WGIA14)” from 26 to 28 July 2016 in Mongolia’s capital city, Ulaanbaatar. The main purpose of the annual workshop was to  develop and improve national GHG inventories in the Asian region and to enhance cooperative relationships as a means of achieving this.

93 participants attended WGIA14, including government and research institution representatives of thirteen countries (Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao P.D.R., Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Republic of Korea, Thailand and Vietnam), in addition to representatives of the Technical Support Unit of the IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and others.

Mutual learning sessions on GHG inventories were held during the workshop, and discussions took place on themes related to Biennial Update Reports (BURs) and to various activities with co-benefits for GHG inventories/mitigation and related support. In the mutual learning sessions, the following four GHG inventory sectors were taken up – Energy, Industrial Processes, Land Use, Land-Use Change and forestry (LULUCF) and Waste.

For each session, two countries engaged with each other by following up on the Q&A which had taken place over the course of two and a half months preceding the workshop. Experts and government officials in charge of the national inventory from the partnering countries met each other in person at the sessions, clarifying their questions and elaborating on their answers.

Through the mutual learning sessions, specific issues in the four inventory sectors were identified and some solutions were proposed. Common difficulties such as challenges in collecting activity data or achieving completeness in the coverage of sources/sinks, as well as institutional arrangement issues were acknowledged.

Following the mutual learning sessions, the following topics were taken up in the plenary sessions: 1) Updates on the National Communications and BURs from developing country Parties, 2) Institutional Arrangements for National GHG Inventories and BURs, 3) Good Practices in the International Consultation and Analysis (ICA) Process, and 4) Activities with co-benefits for GHG inventories/mitigation and related support.

firewood

Photo credit: Basharat Alam Shah

In Session 1), participants exchanged views on how to interpret UNFCCC decisions, and the practicalities of implementing them. It was acknowledged that the 2006 IPCC Guidelines reflect the latest scientific knowledge, but the transition to using them requires capacity building. In Session 2), the importance of coordinating between institutional arrangements for inventory preparation, mitigation planning and adaptation was highlighted. In Session 3), it was acknowledged that the ICA process contributes to enhancing transparency, and the capacity of countries to improve their GHG inventories, mitigation and emission reduction work, as well as to the next submission of BURs and Nationally Determined Contributions. In Session 4), participants reconfirmed the co-benefits between air pollution control, terrestrial monitoring and the enhancing of GHG inventories. Clarifications were also sought and provided for related support for the improvement of GHG inventories.

 

  
Register for the CGE e-learning courses by 1 September 2017! The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from non-Annex I Parties (CGE) has developed online e-learning courses to assist the preparation of national communications.
29/08/2017 12:08No presence informationBhava Dhungana29/08/2017 13:4129.08.2017

​Register for the CGE e-learning courses by 1 September 2017! The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from non-Annex I Parties (CGE) has developed online e-learning courses to assist the preparation of national communications. The e-courses are free of charge and are open to everyone. Participants have 3 months to complete the course and will receive a certificate upon completion. Please mail any questions to tisu@unfccc.int. Register for the e-courses here>> http://bit.ly/1Ex9GIC

  
As part of the Paris Agreement, Parties to the UNFCCC agreed to establish a Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT) to strengthen the institutional and technical capacities of developing countries to meet the enhanced transparency requirements of the Paris Agreement.
06/12/2017 11:48No presence informationMarlan Pillay01/11/2019 11:4106.12.2017
In order to strengthen the institutional and technical capacities of developing countries to meet the transparency requirements of the Paris Agreement, countries agreed to establish a Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT). The GEF was requested to support the establishment and operation of the CBIT, including through voluntary contributions to support developing countries during GEF-6 (2014- 2018) and future replenishment cycles.
The CBIT has three aims:
1.       Strengthen national institutions for transparency-related activities in line with national priorities
2.       Provide relevant tools, training and assistance for meeting the provisions stipulated in Article 13 of the Agreement Assist in the improvement of transparency over time
3.       Assist in the improvement of transparency over time
More information on the CBIT can be found here:
·         Video on the CBIT
·         Information leaflet on CBIT
All developing country Parties have access to the CBIT upon request. A list of projects approved under the CBIT can be found here: Projects under CBIT

 

  
The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE) organized a side-event on 9 November 2017 on the margins of COP 23 to showcase the key achievements of the group and success stories of developing countries on the preparation of the national communications (NCs) and biennial update reports (BURs).
06/12/2017 10:59No presence informationMarlan Pillay06/12/2017 12:3006.12.2017

​The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE) organized a side-event on 9 November 2017 on the margins of COP 23 to showcase the key achievements of the group and success stories of developing countries on the preparation of the national communications (NCs) and biennial update reports (BURs). The panel of speakers consisted of Mr. Stephen King’uyu, the CGE member from Kenya, Ms. Emma Rachmawaty from Indonesia, and Ms. Mariana Kaspzyk from Uruguay. Mr. William Agyemang-Bonsu from the secretariat moderated the event.

Mr. King’uyu outlined the key objectives of the group, its strategic priorities, and its key activities in 2017. The key outputs of the CGE included updated training materials on:
  1. Reporting of mitigation actions and their effects in BURs;
  2. National greenhouse gas inventories;
  3. Reporting information on finance, technology transfer and capacity-building needs and support received;
The CGE also prepared a “Technical Tool to Facilitate Parties Prepare for and Participate in The International Consultation and Analysis”;
Mr. King’uyu also informed that in addition to the updated training materials, the CGE had also conducted two regional hands-on training workshops on the preparation of mitigation action and reporting on them in national communications (NCs) and biennial update reports (BURs), and 7 webinars, which is complemented by the online e-learning courses on the topics of GHG inventories, mitigation assessment and vulnerability and adaptation assessment.
Two countries, Indonesia and Uruguay, presented their success stories regarding the preparation and submission of NCs and BURs.
Ms.Rachmawaty from Indonesia shared how the process of preparing the national reports are being improved based on the lessons learned and feedback from the participation in the facilitative sharing of views (FSV). She noted that work on NC and BURs could improve capacity of national and sub-national experts, promote stakeholder engagement and strengthen institutional arrangements. She highlighted a few challenges that needs to be overcome.  These relate to data availability and collection, use of IPCC 2006 guidelines, assessing impacts of mitigation actions, and enhancing and maintaining on a continuous basis appropriate institutional arrangements.  In terms of next steps, she highlight two concrete actions: incorporating baseline and target under its NDC into national development plan.
In addition to the views from Indonesia, Ms. Kasprzyk shared the success stories of Uruguay. Uruguay had first initiated the process of preparation of the NCs in 1994, and since then it has been maintained on a continuous basis. This resulted in having in place sound institutional arrangements with permanent team in the Climate Change Division supported by specific sectoral working groups.  This, in turn, enable Uruguay to continuously and actively engage in the MRV process.  Till date, Uruguay has already completed 4 rounds of NCs and the first BUR.  The preparation of the fifth NC is underway and is about to submit second BUR.  These reports were noted to be help at the national level, among other things, in raising awareness on climate change and also as a tool for policy-making.
This animation explains the benefits of the measurement, reporting and verification
The webcast of the side-event is available here (starting at 8:50)
The presentations are available here.
  
To foster transparency, trust and confidence and promote climate action Parties to the UNFCCC put in place arrangements for measurement, reporting and verification (MRV). The transparency mechanism under the UNFCCC process uses a language which is full of acronyms, and this video explains some of them.
29/08/2017 12:14No presence informationBhava Dhungana29/08/2017 12:1829.08.2017

​To foster transparency, trust and confidence and promote climate action Parties to the UNFCCC put in place arrangements for measurement, reporting and verification (MRV). The transparency mechanism under the UNFCCC process uses a language which is full of acronyms, and this video explains some of them.

Find the video here

 

For more information viste the site here

  
An event showcasing initiatives to support measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) and the transparency of action and support was held on November 13, 2017, during the twenty-third Conference of Parties.
06/12/2017 11:02No presence informationMarlan Pillay06/12/2017 12:2906.12.2017

An event showcasing initiatives to support measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) and the transparency of action and support was held on November 13, 2017, during the twenty-third Conference of Parties.
The expert panel – the Global Environment Facility (GEF); the UNDP/UN Environment Global Support Programme (GSP); and the Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (ICAT-UNEP-DTU) presented support initiatives focused on the enhancement of developing countries’ national capacity to effectively participate in the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention, as well as their preparations to implement the modalities, procedures and guidelines of the transparency framework under the Paris Agreement. A representative from the National Council for Climate Change and the Clean Development Mechanism of the Dominican Republic also provided their experience and lessons learned in mobilizing and accessing necessary support in a timely manner.
 
Photo: L-R: Karen Hedeman Lluberes (Dominican Republic); John Christensen (Director of UNEP DTU Partnership); Monica Echegoyen (ICAT Coordinator); Dominique Revet (UNFCCC secretariat); Damiano Borgogno (UNDP GSP); Milena Gonzalez Vasquez (the GEF).
The event was moderated by the UNFCCC secretariat. It was well-attended and generated interest and views from the audience during an interactive Question and Answer session.
Overall, the panel discussion reinforced the idea that effective participation in the current MRV arrangements under the Convention and transparency framework under the Paris Agreement requires long-term efforts for capacity-building support in developing countries and a systemic approach to build robust and sustainable national MRV systems. The panelists highlighted the need to ensure that the information prepared and submitted in national reports is relevant to national development process by informing relevant policies, plans and thus gaining political buy-in at national level. The degree to which support opportunities are effectively utilized can be enhanced by a high degree of political commitment from policy-makers and government officials.
The representatives of support providers outlined their initiatives available to developing countries to strengthen or establish national MRV systems. The financial, technical and capacity-building support has been provided in areas of, inter alia, developing legal frameworks and instruments; enhancing or consolidating existing institutional arrangements; improving data collection and management; and producing high quality national communications and biennial update reports (also known as BURs).
The Dominican Republic shared their experience and lessons learned in conducting a technical, institutional and legal analysis to examine the current situation and identify the gaps in regards to the main elements that make up a national MRV/Transparency System that is compatible with national data management practices as well as with reporting requirements to the UNFCCC. Their aim is to produce a mapping of existing relevant institutions that will play a role in the institutional arrangement to implement the MRV system; and to create a road map detailing the activities that need to be implemented for obtaining reliable and regular information on GHG emissions and reductions.
The interactive discussion with the audience led to an emphasis on the need for developing countries to encapsulate the knowledge and experience gained from the MRV process, as well as showcase their efforts and progress made.
The webcast of the side-event is available here.
The presentations are available here.
  
A new guidance document for the peer review of GHG inventories for Parties has been created by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) secretariat, with the support of the Global Support Programme (GSP) for National Communications and Biennial Update Reports (GSP).
29/08/2017 11:52No presence informationBhava Dhungana29/08/2017 11:5729.08.2017

​The document aims to serve as a manual for experts to assess the GHG inventory and inventory development process. It describes how to perform a review of national GHG inventory management systems and national GHG inventories for non-Annex I Parties, taking into consideration and ensuring consistency with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines for national GHG inventories, and the Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) training materials, workbooks, templates on developing sustainable national GHG inventory systems. Parties to the UNFCCC submit information on the implementation of the Convention, including national actions to mitigate and adapt to the climate change as well as inventory of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Developing countries submit this information through national communications every four years and biennial update reports every two years. The greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories form the core of part of these reports.

Read more about it here

  
The CGE, in 2017, updated several of its training materials with a view to ensuring that developing country Parties have the latest information and technical guidance available to effectively participate in the measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) process, including the preparation of BURs and the international consultation and analysis (ICA) process.
06/12/2017 10:56No presence informationMarlan Pillay06/12/2017 12:3006.12.2017

The CGE, in 2017, updated several of its training materials with a view to ensuring that developing country Parties have the latest information and technical guidance available to effectively participate in the measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) process, including the preparation of BURs and the international consultation and analysis (ICA) process.
The updated training materials on reporting information on GHG inventories, mitigation actions, and support needed and received provide the context for reporting, and explanation of the different reporting provisions through concrete examples and templates. The training materials provide guidance on how to ensure the completeness of information reported, examples and key considerations to take into account, templates for providing such information and questions to guide the process when preparing and finalizing the information to be reported.
In additional, the CGE also prepared a technical tool at assist developing country Parties prepare for and participate in the technical analysis of their BURs and the facilitative sharing of views.
  
Last month, from 15th to 22nd of March 2019, 196 participants, of which 47 African countries, private sector and other non-Party stakeholders mobilized at the Africa Climate Week 2019 in Accra, Ghana to discuss and advance the climate action agenda of the region. The Africa Climate Week is actually the first of the Regional Climate Week planned for this year – the latter two being the Latin America and Carribean Climate Week and the Asia Pacific Climate Week. One of the events held during the Africa Climate Week, was the NDC regional climate dialogue which aims at boosting ambition and accelerating climate actions. 
15/04/2019 16:02Laure Fouchecourt15/04/2019 16:0215.04.2019

Last month, from 15th to 22nd of March 2019, 196 participants, of which 47 African countries, private sector and other non-Party stakeholders mobilized at the Africa Climate Week 2019 in Accra, Ghana to discuss and advance the climate action agenda of the region. 

The Africa Climate Week is actually the first of the Regional Climate Week planned for this year – the latter two being the Latin America and Caribbean Climate Week and the Asia Pacific Climate Week. One of the events held during the Africa Climate Week, was the NDC regional climate dialogue which aims at boosting ambition and accelerating climate actions.  
 
Translating NDCs into concrete climate actions is complex and requires a whole-of-country approach. 
 
In Ghana, two days were dedicated to technical dialogues on the implementation of the climate commitments or “Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). These technical NDC dialogues, running since 2014, have been organized by the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and UN Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat to help countries plan and implement their climate commitments. Discussions focused on the preparation of second-round NDCs with increased clarity and ambition; capacity strengthening for tracking NDC implementation progress; and peer-to-peer knowledge exchange, building on lessons learned from implementing initial NDCs and drawing on the outcomes of the Talanoa Dialogue and COP24. The dialogues further invited countries to look to 2050 and beyond and encourage the formulation of long-term climate strategies, which countries are invited to submit to the UNFCCC by 2020. The outcomes of each dialogue will be presented to the UN Climate Action Summit, in September 2019.At the dialogue, the representation of key stakeholders from all sectors of society provided a clear indication that this inclusive engagement process was well underway in the region. Participants noted that in Africa, the regional, municipal and local actors need to help bridge the gap between ambitious national climate targets and the concrete actions required on the ground. 
 
However, in order to achieve the 1.5C temperature goal of the Paris Agreement, Africa will have to focus on three strategies. Firstly, as Africa's development is linked to the world's capacity to address climate change, its climate plans - mitigation and adaptation actions – will have to be aligned with national development plans and strategies. Secondly, to identify opportunities, to plan, finance and implement action at all levels - national, sub-national, local and across sectors – the data collected will need to be consistent, reliable and comparable. Finally, financial instruments and innovative financing mechanisms must be leveraged to mobilize adequate climate finance. Enabling environment for private sector engagement and public-private collaborations must also be further enhanced to ensure the required pace and scale of climate action is fulfilled in these critical years ahead. 
 
In addition, as part of the Africa Climate Week, the Government of Ghana and UNDP organized a 2 days NDC Investment Forum to discuss ways to crowding-in private sector investment for projects in Ghana that are financially viable, and that also deliver the climate solutions Ghana pledged in their NDC. 
 
The host country, Ghana, has led by example by creating a conducive environment for private sector engagement in the planning and implementation of its climate actions. Having designed emission reduction plans for cooling, cooking and lighting - through energy efficient refrigerators and clean energy cooking and lighting appliances - Ghana developed an investor guide to attract financing from the private sector for low carbon development. 
 
More info about the NDC Dialogue can be found here. 
 
  
The twelfth round of technical analysis under the international consultation and analysis (ICA) process was convened in Bonn, Germany, from 25 February to 1 March 2019. Biennial update reports (BUR) submitted by six developing country Parties (BUR1 for El Salvador, Côte d'Ivoire, Malaysia and Yemen, and BUR2 for Azerbaijan, Ghana and Malaysia) were technically analyzed by two teams of technical experts (TTE).
25/03/2019 09:23Laure Fouchecourt25/03/2019 09:2325.03.2019
The twelfth round of technical analysis under the international consultation and analysis (ICA) process was convened in Bonn, Germany, from 25 February to 1 March 2019. Biennial update reports (BUR) submitted by six developing country Parties (BUR1 for El Salvador, Côte d'Ivoire, Malaysia and Yemen, and BUR2 for Azerbaijan, Ghana and Malaysia) were technically analyzed by two teams of technical experts (TTE).
During the opening session, the secretariat reiterated that the ICA process provides a useful “testing ground” for developing countries to participate in the enhanced transparency framework in the next few years. The successful adoption of the transparency modalities, procedures and guidelines (MPGs) at the twenty fourth session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 24), was underscored as setting the direction for the implementation of the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement. Information was provided to enable the experts to have a better understanding of the timelines in transitioning from the implementation of the existing MRV system to the new transparency framework. Experts were therefore encouraged to fully engage in the technical analysis process, that will facilitate this transition.
 
The participation of some experts in negotiating the MPGs and their knowledge of the special circumstances of developing country Parties, further enhanced the technical analysis process and consultation with Parties being analysed during the technical analysis week. The TTEs were quite keen to participate and support Parties, particularly in identifying capacity-building needs, that could improve their transparency of reporting and readiness for successful implementation of the enhanced transparency framework.
 
Over the next nine months, the TTEs, in consultation with the Parties, will prepare the summary reports for each of the Parties analysed. Once published on the secretariat’s website, these summary reports will serve as input to the facilitative sharing of views process for these Parties. In the long term, the experiences and lessons learned by the secretariat, experts and Parties will be an important source of information for successful implementation of the enhanced transparency framework.
 
Since the launch of the ICA process in 2015, 45 developing country Parties have submitted 74 reports, including 45 first, 25 second and 4 third BURs. To date, the secretariat has involved 167 experts in conducting 12 rounds of technical analyses. 52 of the summary reports from these processes have been published on the UNFCCC website, additional information is available here: https://unfccc.int/process/transparency-and-reporting/reporting-and-review-under-the-convention/biennial-update-reports-and-international-consultation-and-analysis-non-annex-i-parties/international-consultation-and-analysis-process/international-consultation-and-analysis
 
  
UN Climate Change is launching today a webinar series to support developing nations in reporting on their efforts to tackle climate change.

The series aims to provide a platform for practitioners to focus in-depth on specific methods or tools, across all the themes, namely, greenhouse gas inventory, mitigation, vulnerability and adaptation, and support.
06/04/2018 14:06No presence informationBhava Dhungana06/04/2018 14:0606.04.2018

UN Climate Change is launching today a webinar series to support developing nations in reporting on their efforts to tackle climate change.

The series aims to provide a platform for practitioners to focus in-depth on specific methods or tools, across all the themes, namely, greenhouse gas inventory, mitigation, vulnerability and adaptation, and support.
 
The webinar series will focus on:
  • How a country can better implement the current Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) arrangements under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
  • How a country can better showcase its climate action on mitigation and adaptation through national communications and biennial update reports
  • Methodologies used and tools available
  • Lessons learned and good practices from developing countries.
The webinars, 45-60 minutes in duration, will be held in the first and third week of each month. They will be offered in English, Spanish and French, as resources permit.
The kick-off webinar on “Introduction to MRV process and cross-cutting issues” will start at 3 pm (CET) on 5 April 2018. The topics covered will include:
  • Introduction to the 2018 webinar series
  • Overview of the MRV process for developing countries
  • Explanation of the institutional arrangements that are needed for MRV systems
  • Process for gender mainstreaming when preparing national reports.
The webinar series is organized by the Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE), an expert group that provides technical assistance and advice to developing countries to participate effectively in the MRV arrangements under the UNFCCC.
Register here.
Subsequent sessions will be programmed based on the emerging interests and priorities of the countries.
Stay in touch
For further information on the CGE’s training materials and tools, click here.
To stay updated on this webinar series, “like” the Mitigation and Transparency Exchange Facebook page.
  
A series of Regional Climate Weeks will kick-start conversations for the Summit in Africa, Latin America and Asia Pacific. Two days of the Regional Climate Weeks will be dedicated to technical dialogues on the implementation of the climate commitments or “Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).
05/02/2019 16:42No presence informationSerkant Samurkas05/02/2019 16:4205.02.2019

2019 is a critical year for climate action – as climate change has become the “biggest threat to the global economy”, per the UN Secretary-General António Guterres. Central in this mobilization effort is the UN Secretary-General’s 2019 Climate Summit in September, which aims to boost ambition and accelerate action.

A series of Regional Climate Weeks will kick-start conversations for the Summit in Africa, Latin America and Asia Pacific. Two days of the Regional Climate Weeks will be dedicated to technical dialogues on the implementation of the climate commitments or “Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).
 
The last round of technical NDC dialogues held in 2017-2018 focused on the energy sector and included many inspiring regional processes in climate commitments. This next series will focus on the preparation of second-round NDCs with increased coverage, clarity and ambition; capacity strengthening for tracking NDC implementation progress; and peer-to-peer knowledge exchange, building on lessons learned from implementing initial NDCs and drawing on the outcomes of the Talanoa Dialogue and COP24.
 
Read more here.
 
Be sure to check out the Mitigation & Transparency Exchange Facebook page and “like” us!
 
  
The NDC Regional Dialogue convenes countries from the same region to share their approaches and experiences with NDC planning and implementation activities. One of the objectives is to identify opportunities for translating NDCs into concrete actions (in particular in the energy sector) to contribute to NDC goals.
26/07/2018 17:11No presence informationSerkant Samurkas26/07/2018 17:1126.07.2018

Since 2015, the UNFCCC secretariat and UNDP organize NDC Regional Dialogues to raise awareness and understanding of the challenges in planning and implementing the National Determined Contributions (NDCs). The NDC Regional Dialogue convenes countries from the same region to share their approaches and experiences with NDC planning and implementation activities. These dialogues are also an opportunity to bring together governments from the regions with donors and support institutions.

Up until now, a total of 16 NDC Regional Dialogues have been held since 2015 in most regions of the world, including Latin America, Africa, Pacific, and Eurasia, reaching over 1500 participants from more than 150 governments. For 2016-2018, the objectives of the dialogues are:

- Exchange national experiences and views related to NDC implementation planning, including linkages to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) and other planning processes, as well as opportunities to advance gender equality;

- Identify opportunities for translating NDCs into concrete actions (in particular in the energy sector) to contribute to NDC goals;

- Discuss finance considerations, including private-sector engagement, in the context of NDC implementation;

- Discuss future steps on NDCs in the context of the Talanoa Dialogue, raising ambition, and long-term development strategies.

The next regional NDC dialogue will take place in the first week of October in Bangkok, Thailand for the Asia region and the second week of October in Castries, St. Lucia for the Caribbean region.


During the latest round of dialogues, it became clear that governments around the world are facing similar challenges as regards NDC implementation under the Paris Agreement. For example, many countries are currently looking into how to best determining institutional arrangements and coordination mechanisms, increasing stakeholder ownership and building capacity, as well as planning for implementation. With regards to funding the NDC implementation activities,  government are working on costing out actions and developing funding strategies, including accessing finance sources and support for action. It appears that there is a clear need for related capacity building support for MRV systems and linking NDC implementation with National Communications (NCs), Biennial Update Reports (BURs), Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) reporting efforts.


About NDCs


NDCs are at the heart of the Paris Agreement and the achievement of these long-term goals. NDCs embody efforts by each country to reduce national emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The Paris Agreement (Article 4, paragraph 2) requires each Party to prepare, communicate and maintain successive NDCs that it intends to achieve. Parties shall pursue domestic mitigation measures, with the aim of achieving the objectives of such contributions.

NDCs are then recorded in the NDC registry which is publicly available and maintained by the secretariat. Modalities and procedures for the operation and use of this public registry are currently being negotiated under the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), agenda item 6. Until the modalities and procedures of the public NDC registry are finalized, communicated NDCs are registered and available in the interim NDC registry.

Up to this date, there are 172 Parties that have submitted their first NDCs out of 178 Parties that have ratified the Paris Agreement. Under the provisions of the Paris Agreement, Parties will be expected to submit an updated NDC every five years, which will represent a progression beyond the country’s then current NDC to reflect its highest possible ambition.

For more information about NDC Regional Dialogues and other NDC related events, please click here.

Follow Mitigation & Transparency Exchange Facebook page for updates about NDCs.​

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