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Technical resources for implementing the measurement, reporting and verification arrangements under the Convention and the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement.
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Figure 1 Participants of the 11th Group of Friends meeting
05/07/2022 13:13No presence informationSharon Kirabo-Steffens05/07/2022 13:1305.07.2022

The ETF Group of Friends (formerly referred to as the "Group of Friends on the MRV/Transparency") is an informal network of entities actively supporting developing countries on transparency issues. Since 2016, the group has served as a platform to exchange information, lessons learned and experiences in engaging with and assisting developing countries and promote coordination and collaboration amongst support providers. 

As Parties transition from the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention to the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement, support for developing countries is viewed as a critical factor in the successful implementation of the ETF. In this context, the group gathered for the 11th time on the margins of the just-concluded Bonn Climate Change Conference in June 2022. 

At this meeting, the group reaffirmed its current and ongoing aspiration is to contribute to a successful implementation of the ETF by ensuring that no country is left behind and achieve universal participation by 31 December 2024. The group identified some strategies to strengthen its network: developing a common vision and consistent messaging; improving information sharing on transparency; engaging with regional climate networks and hubs; continuing meeting at the global and regional level to create an enabling environment for facilitated coordination when supporting developing countries. 

35 representatives from 24 member entities attended the meeting: Canada, Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), German Environment Agency, Global Environment Facility (GEF), Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI), GRA Inventories and NDC Research Network, Greenhouse Gas Inventory Office of Japan (GIO), Greenhouse Gas Management Institute (GHGMI), Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (ICAT), Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), Korea - Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Research Center (GIR), Latin American Network on National GHG Inventories (RedINGEI), Ministry of Environment Japan, NDC Partnership, NDC Support Network, Partnership on Transparency in the Paris Agreement (PATPA), Singapore, Switzerland, UNFCCC secretariat, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), United States, and World Resources Institute (WRI).




  
Some of the participants at the ETF Group of Friends meetings for the Latin America and the Caribbean.
28/04/2022 16:03No presence informationSharon Kirabo-Steffens05/07/2022 13:1528.04.2022

The existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement are important tools for countries to assess the implementation and achievement of their national climate objectives. The ETF will also provide a snapshot of global efforts in achieving the Paris Agreement goal of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees. 

The ETF Group of Friends (formerly referred to as the "Group of Friends on the MRV/Transparency") is an informal network of stakeholders providing financial, technical, and capacity-building support to developing countries on MRV and transparency issues. Between 7 December 2021 and 5 April 2022, the Group has met at the regional level for Asia-Pacific, Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean to foster collaboration and synergies amongst themselves in these regions. 

The messages coming out of these regional discussions were clear - a high level of interest in continued exchange of information, experiences and lessons learned on previous, ongoing and planned MRV/ETF activities. They were also keen on exploring collaboration opportunities and synergies amongst themselves. They noted more coordinated and systematic approaches would help the efficiency and effectiveness of the support provided to developing countries. The participants also brainstormed on possible ways to strengthen the use of the ETF Group of Friends as a tool for coordination and promoting synergies. 

These three regional meetings convened 79 participants from 19 institutions.[1] These institutions include Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa, European Commission, Food and Agriculture Organization, German Federal Foreign Office, GIZ, Global Green Growth Institute, Greenhouse Gas Management Institute, Initiative for Climate Action Transparency, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, Latin American Network on National GHG Inventories, Ministry of the Environment (Japan), NDC Partnership, New Zealand Agricultural GHG Research Centre, Partnership on Transparency in the Paris Agreement, the UNFCCC secretariat, United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme and the United States Environmental Protection Agency.


In conjunction with the 56th session of the Subsidiary Bodies, the Group will have its global meeting in June 2022 in Bonn, Germany.



[1] The number of participants is a sum of participant numbers of three regional meetings, regardless of whether some attended more than one meeting. In contrast, each institution was counted only once.

  
Some of the participants at the ETF Group of Friends Meeting for the Africa region.
29/03/2022 17:43No presence informationSharon Kirabo-Steffens30/03/2022 14:4129.03.2022

COP26 in Glasgow finalized the remaining technical details to bring the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement to life. The final biennial update reports under the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention by developing countries shall be submitted no later than 31 December 2024.  On the other hand, the first biennial transparency reports and national inventory report, if submitted as a stand-alone report, under the ETF shall be submitted at the latest by 31 December 2024. As Parties transition from the existing MRV arrangements to the ETF, support to developing countries is viewed as a critical factor to achieve universal participation in the ETF.

The ETF Group of Friends (formerly referred to as the "Group of Friends on the MRV/Transparency") is an informal network of stakeholders providing financial, technical, and capacity-building support to developing countries on MRV and transparency issues. To better support developing country Parties in this critical period, the Group has been meeting at the regional level to foster collaboration and synergies amongst themselves. Following the meeting organized for the Asia-Pacific region in December 2021, the Group met again on 17 March with a focus on the Africa region.

 The UNFCCC secretariat and Global Green Growth Institute co-organized this meeting. Meeting participants exchanged experiences and lessons learned on ongoing and planned support activities in the field of MRV/ETF system building, discussed collaboration opportunities and challenges, and brainstormed potential solutions to address these challenges.

 Many participants were of the view that the support needs on MRV and ETF from the developing country Parties are enormous. Synergies among different support activities will increase their effectiveness, and active information sharing is a crucial enabling factor for improved synergies. Some participants proposed that the Group of Friends should meet more frequently at the regional level to better coordinate support activities in each region. 

28 participants from 10 institutions attended this meeting. These institutions include Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa, Food and Agriculture Organization, German Federal Foreign Office, Global Green Growth Institute, Greenhouse Gas Management Institute, Partnership on Transparency in the Paris Agreement, Initiative for Climate Action Transparency, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, United Nations Environment Programme, and the UNFCCC secretariat.

 The next Group of Friend regional meeting is for Latin America and the Caribbean and will be held on 5 April 2022​.







  
Dr Arunabha Ghosh, CEO of the CEEW and Mr. Ovais Sarmad, Deputy Executive Secretary UNFCCC at the MoU signing ceremony in New Delhi.
23/03/2022 12:11No presence informationSharon Kirabo-Steffens23/03/2022 14:2323.03.2022

The United Nations Climate Change secretariat and the Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW) are pleased to announce their strategic partnership to develop a framework and tools that will enhance the capacity of developing countries to report on climate change as part of the Climate Change Convention and Enhanced Transparency Framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement.      

 The ETF modalities,  procedures and guidelines (MPGs) emphasise the need for developing country Parties to ascertain their capacity constraints and requirements for reporting climate action and support. It urges them to better understand their national circumstances, develop a continuous improvement plan and use the flexibility provisions in the MPGs in light of their capacities.

 The UN Climate Change secretariat-CEEW partnership is premised on the recognition that developing countries that are Party to the Paris Agreement are at different starting points with respect to their capabilities and the institutional arrangements to effectively report on climate action and support in accordance with the MPGs. Building on the research done previously by CEEW, the partnership envisions to develop a framework and tool that can be used by developing country Parties to enhance their capacity to report on climate change.

 Developing country Parties need support to transition to the ETF MPGs. We look forward to working with the UN Climate Change secretariat to support developing country Parties to enhance their climate change reporting as a critical pillar of building confidence, and highlighting their capacity needs and the challenges so that commensurate resources can be provided to them,” said Dr Arunabha Ghosh, CEO of the Council on Energy, Environment and Water.

 ‘’We welcome this collaboration with CEEW to help developing country Parties to identify their capacity needs as well as access support opportunities to enhance and submit their biennial transparency reports,’’ said Mr Ovais Sarmad, Deputy Executive Secretary of UN Climate Change secretariat.

 It is envisaged that the framework and tool should be ready for piloting within the next 12 months.

 For more information, please contact:

Transparency Division, CGE/ETF Support Unit, tisu@unfccc.int

 

 ​

  
The 7th CGE meeting took place from 28 February to 1 March 2022 in a virtual format. At the meeting, the group successfully revised their mission vision and strategic priorities (taking into consideration the revised terms of reference from COP 26), and they also successful developed their work program in addition to the key activities for 2022.
15/03/2022 08:52No presence informationSharon Kirabo-Steffens15/03/2022 09:2815.03.2022

COP 26 in Glasgow demonstrated a strong political signal from the global community of the urgent need to fight against climate change. For the enhanced transparency framework (ETF), COP 26 adopted further technical work on the modalities, procedures and guidelines for the ETF, with tables, outlines and other formats for the reports agreed. It also committed enhanced support for implementing the ETF, including guidance to the role of Consultative Group of Experts (CGE).

 

At the seventh meeting of the CGE, the group successfully developed its work programme for 2022 – 2026 based on its revised terms of reference, and also identified its key activities for 2022. The meeting of the CGE took place virtually on 28 February and 1 March 2022 and elected Mr. Alpha Kaloga (Guinea) as the Chair and Ms. Tian Wang (China) as the Rapporteur for 2022.

 

The CGE has so far played a leading role in supporting the implementation of the measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and facilitating the transition to the ETF under the Paris Agreement. The outcomes of COP 26 can further inform and strengthen the role of the CGE in providing technical advice and support to developing country Parties through its strategic priorities and activities in accordance with its work plan. For example, the CGE agreed to organize its regional hands-on training workshops focusing on tracking progress of NDCs under the ETF, including mitigation assessment, tracking progress of implementation and achievement of NDCs through use of indicators, and support needed and received in relation to tracking progress of NDCs.

 

In the coming years, the CGE will continue supporting the developing country Parties in implementing the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and facilitating transition to and implementation of the ETF under the Paris Agreement. It will also stock take the lessons learned and good practices, understand the areas of improvement, refine the approaches and tools used to provide technical advice and support in facilitating the implementation of the existing MRV arrangements and the ETF. Meanwhile, the CGE will promote collaboration and engagement with key stakeholders and enhance outreach activities.

 

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Visual summary of the 4th informal forum of the Consultative Group of Experts
17/12/2021 11:21No presence informationBhava Dhungana17/12/2021 11:2317.12.2021

The Glasgow COP26 outcomes demonstrate a strong political signal from the global community of the urgent need to accelerate progress to ensure that the world can fulfil the fundamental goals of the Paris Agreement. For the enhanced transparency framework (ETF), further technical work on the modalities, procedures and guidelines for the ETF was completed, with tables, outlines and other formats for the reports agreed.

With the recent conclusion of the terms of reference of the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) at COP26, CGE is now poised to play its role in making further progress and enhancing international collaboration so that countries are in a position to implement the enhanced transparency framework. To inform the key stakeholders on its current and future work and seek their feedbacks, the CGE virtually organized its fourth informal forum on 8 December 2021. More than 100 experts worldwide participated in this forum. They included both country experts and support providers from various organizations involved in the implementation of the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and the ETF under the Paris Agreement. The discussions will feed into the development of CGE’s work programme for 2022 – 2026.

The Deputy Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC secretariat, Mr. Ovais Sarmad, the Chair of the CGE, Ms. Virginia Sena, and the Chair of the Subsidiary Body for the Implementation, Ms. Marianne Karlsen laid out the key messages and ETF-related achievements at COP 26 and shared their expectations on this informal forum and the CGE’s future work.​


The CGE used innovative approaches and methods to successfully implement its workplans for 2020 and 2021, which resulted in:

  • Training 609 national experts through 14 virtual regional hands-on training workshops;
  • Reaching 709 experts, through webinars on key thematic issues;
  • Developing, translating and disseminating online training resources, which included animation videos, technical handbooks, and hands-on exercises; and
  • Compiling and summarizing capacity-building needs for the preparation of national communications and biennial update reports.

Participants shared their reflections on the achievements and lessons learnt of the CGE, and requested the CGE to continue its support on MRV and ETF in 2022 and beyond. One participant highlighted the added value of the virtual webinars/workshops organized by the CGE in the last two years.  According to her, these virtual events helped broaden the engagement of national experts from line agencies which would not have been possible otherwise due to the limited number of participants from each country when the events were organized as in-person. The sharing of materials and recordings also allowed more people to benefit from these events. She hopes the CGE can organize more of such webinars/workshops in future.

Participants also informally reflected and exchanged views around the experiences on domestic political buy-in, capacity-building and access to finance, which are critical to sustaining national efforts to enhance reporting under the Convention and the Paris Agreement. For example, participants shared some emerging needs for capacity building, such as training on the reporting tables, outlines and other formats for ETF agreed at COP26. One country shared how they received financial support from their international MRV/ETF support provider partners by conducting a need assessment of the governmental agencies and request for very specific supports, etc.

Participants also proposed some areas that they wish the CGE to take into consideration for the development of its workplan. The key messages from this forum will be utilized to inform the CGE’s future workplan thereby ensuring that the activities rolled out respond to the needs of developing country Parties on their important journey to implement the MRV arrangements and use that as a foundation to prepare for and implement the ETF.


Event video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ex2FRH2ZNmc

More info: https://unfccc.int/event/4th-informal-forum-of-the-consultative-group-of-experts​​ 



  
The MRV Group of Friends organized a virtual meeting for the Asia-Pacific regional meeting on 7 December 2021.
16/12/2021 12:20No presence informationSharon Kirabo-Steffens16/12/2021 12:2916.12.2021

Measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) and enhanced transparency framework (ETF) are critical in achieving the objectives of the Convention and the Paris Agreement. Despite the shadow cast by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the international community continues supporting the implementation of MRV and ETF with great effort. 

The Group of Friends on the MRV/Transparency is an informal network of stakeholders providing financial, technical, and capacity-building support to developing countries on MRV and transparency issues. 

On 7 December, the UNFCCC secretariat and Institute for Global Environmental Strategies co-organized the first Group of Friends regional meeting in the Asia Pacific. This meeting provided international and regional MRV and ETF support providers, that are active in the Asia-Pacific region, a platform to exchange experiences and lessons learned on ongoing and planned MRV and ETF support activities. 29 participants from 15 organizations/programmes shared their project updates and exchanged their views and experience. 

For example, the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies is implementing a Mutual Learning Program for Enhanced Transparency with support from the Ministry of the Environment, Japan. This program aims to support countries and organizations in learning and practising reporting of climate actions over a 7-month period or longer. The program’s current objectives are to understand how to apply the reporting guidance under the Paris Agreement, explore what areas to improve in the reports, including the first biennial transparency report (BTR), and strengthen the network of institutions and individuals that are working on BTRs. In 2021, eight organizations from five countries (Chile, Indonesia, Mongolia, Japan, Thailand) participated in the program and worked on reporting topics under Article 6.2 and Article 13 of the Paris Agreement.

To overcome COVID limitations, FAO developed and rolled out a one-to-one 'mentoring modality' to support countries in addressing the Enhanced Transparency Framework. This modality is​ featured with weekly/bi-weekly calls over three to five months and training a dedicated team on country-specific challenges with practical application and validation. FAO has applied this modality in Madagascar, Papua New Guinea, Mongolia, Guinea, Sudan and Mexico and produced tangible outcomes. For example, FAO supported Papua New Guinea in setting up a transparent climate data archiving system. 

Other participating organizations and programmes include European Commission, GIZ, Global Green Growth Institute, Greenhouse Gas Management Institute, Initiative for Climate Action Transparency, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Ministry of the Environment Japan, NDC Partnership, New Zealand Agricultural GHG Research Centre, Partnership on Transparency in the Paris Agreement/GIZ, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, United Nations Environment Programme and the UNFCCC secretariat. 

In 2022, the secretariat will organize a series of informal Group of Friends regional meetings to bring together and provide a platform for exchange for Group of Friends members and other organizations active in the respective region to support developing countries in MRV and transitioning to the ETF.​

  
Over 300 participants from across the globe, joined the 3rd Informal Forum of the Consultative Group of Experts, held during the ongoing Climate Dialogues.
27/11/2020 13:08No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu27/11/2020 13:0827.11.2020

As part of the ongoing Climate Dialogues, the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) held its 2020 informal forum on 26 November 2020 to showcase its achievements in 2020, and engage with and seek feedback from its key stakeholders.

In opening the forum, both the Chair of the Subsidiary Body of Implementation (SBI), Ms. Marianne Karlsen and the Deputy Executive Secretary for UNFCCC, Mr. Ovais Sarmad, highlighted the important role played by the CGE in building capacities of developing country Parties to implement the  measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and to prepare for the transition to the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement. They noted that as countries prepare for enhanced climate ambition, transparency will play a greater role towards accelerated implementation. As such, they iterated the importance of the informal forum, where participants would learn more about the work of the CGE, and the CGE would receive feedback and suggestions from key stakeholders, in particular on how the CGE could improve the provision of its support to developing country Parties.
Ms. Jenny Mager, representing COP 25 Presidency, also appreciated the important role and the work undertaken by the CGE as being critical to the achievement of the Paris Agreement goals. On her part, Ms. Eve Deaken, who represented the incoming COP 26 Presidency, indicated that the UK would seek and urge the Parties to finalise the outstanding work (negotiations) on the ETF, and clearly define the kind and level of support required for developing countries to participate in the ETF processes.
The informal forum attracted over 300 participants from across the globe. The participants included country experts and policy makers who are the key drivers of MRV/transparency efforts at the national level, and the key bilateral and multilateral agencies, who provide financial and/or technical support on MRV/transparency.
The CGE showcased its achievements in 2020, which included the knowledge products it developed, and the virtual training workshops, webinars and platforms for peer exchange it offered.  The CGE also shared the key findings from its assessment on needs and gaps of developing country Parties. Some of needs expressed by participants during the session included: continued technical support on enhancing institutional arrangements and data management systems; formulation of indicators for tracking progress of implementing and achieving NDCs; preparation of BTRs; technical support in using the 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories; and development of M&E system for NAPs.
In closing the forum, the Chair of the CGE, Mr. Arif Goheer, expressed his appreciation to the participants for joining the event and sharing their views. Mr. Goheer noted that the informal forum had provided important feedback directly from the CGE target audiences, which would help the CGE in ensuring that its technical support addresses the state of play, priorities, constraints, gaps and needs. He assured the participants that the CGE would consider the suggestions provided, when formulating its annual work plan for 2021.
A channel to provide your suggestions to the CGE remains open until 4 December 2020. Go to  www.menti.com  and use the code 3012323. Presentations made during the informal forum and its recording will be shared here, and a procedural summary of CGE informal forum will also be shared on the CGE webpage  https://unfccc.int/CGE soon.
  
The GHG inventories are a critical component of the National Communications and Biennial Update Reports, which are important in tracking climate action progress under the Convention. Photo - Unsplash Scott Graham
25/06/2020 14:36No presence informationBhava Dhungana29/06/2020 17:0925.06.2020

Despite the COVID-19 crisis, the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), an expert group under the Convention and the Paris Agreement mandated to provide technical support to developing Parties in meeting their reporting requirements under the Convention and the Paris Agreement, has during the first half of 2020, engaged with over 200 experts on national GHG inventories.

The CGE is determined to minimize the impacts of the corona virus to its 2020 work plan and is therefore fully committed to implementing its activities, including enhancing capacity of developing countries on methodologies to prepare national GHG inventories. The regional webinar series target greenhouse gas inventory compilers and sector experts to discuss technical issues and share lessons regarding transitioning from the Revised 1996 to 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories.
 
 
The first webinar targeted the Asia-Pacific region and was held on 22 April where 47 experts from 23 countries participated.  The second session was for the African and Eastern Europe regions and took place on 20 May with 52 participants from 34 countries.  The third webinar was held in Spanish for the Latin America and Caribbean region on 18 June with 122 participants from 30 countries. The participants appreciated the timeliness and relevance of the webinars, and the informative exchange during the QA sessions.
 
Would you like to learn more about the 2006 IPCC guidelines on national greenhouse gas inventories? Following the interactive discussions, a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ) were prepared  and are uploaded here. The training sessions were also recorded and along with the session presentations are available here. Additionally, general GHG training materials and other CGE training materials can also be found here.
 
Why GHG inventories?
 
  • The GHG inventories are a critical component of the National Communications (NCs) and Biennial Update Reports, (BURs), which are important in tracking climate action progress under the Convention. 
  • With the upcoming enhanced transparency framework (ETF) reporting requirements under the Paris Agreement, Parties are required to use 2006 IPCC guidelines for their GHG inventories.
  
The enhanced transparency framework for action and support established by Article 13 of the Paris Agreement.
19/06/2020 14:41No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu19/06/2020 14:4119.06.2020

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), mandated to provide technical support and advice to developing country Parties to improve capacities to implement the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement, has published a technical handbook on preparing for implementation of the ETF.

The handbook aims to improve awareness and understanding of the ETF and its MPGs by national experts and practitioners from developing country Parties, so that they may consider opportunities to improve current reporting and start planning for the establishment of institutional arrangements and reporting under the ETF. In this regard, the technical handbook among others, provides and explains in detail the information to be reported; describes the technical expert review (TER) and the Facilitative Multilateral Consideration Progress (FMCP) processes. Learn more about the EFT processes and access the handbook here and its addendum here.
  
CGE reinforces committment to its mandate and convenes an ad-hoc virtual meeting to assess the potential impact of COVID-19 on its 2020 workplan.
11/05/2020 13:07No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu11/05/2020 14:0711.05.2020

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), mandated to provide technical support and advice to developing countries improve their capacities to implement the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the ETF under the Paris Agreement has underlined its commitment to deliver its mandate and work despite the COVID-19 pandemic.  To this extent,  The CGE convened an ad-hoc virtual meeting on 14 April 2020 from 14:30 – 16:30 CET (Bonn time) to assess the potential impact of on-going worldwide effects of COVID-19 on its 2020 work plan and discussed how the potential impacts could be managed. The CGE will continue assessing such potential impacts as the situation unfolds and take necessary measures to ensure successful implementation of its workplan.

This level of commitment is critically important given that the current MRV system is set to transition to ETF under the Paris Agreement, which will increasingly require more detailed reporting by all countries. Learn more about the CGE continued commitment here and  the adjustments made to its 2020 workplan in the light of COVID-19 is here.
  
The UNFCCC secretariat conducts virtual review of 16 developed country Party BRs.
11/05/2020 12:26No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu11/05/2020 12:2611.05.2020

Determined to continue its crucial mandated work even during the COVID-19 pandemic, the UN Climate Change secretariat conducted a virtual review of the climate policy and climate action reports from 16 developed country Parties in March and April 2020.

The virtual review included Biennial Reports from Austria, Canada, France, Greece, Ireland, Spain, Australia, Germany, Finland, the EU, Italy, Netherlands, Norway Portugal, Sweden and Switzerland and was conducted by 67 international experts, who performed their function as reviewers.
The virtual review found that due to climate policies and actions implemented, and based on 2017 factual greenhouse gas emissions data, almost all of the 16 developed countries are reaching their 2020 climate targets. The UN Climate Change will publish reports on the review in due course. Learn more about the review here.
  
The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), has rolled out some of the planned capacity building initiatives for 2020 despite the COVID-19 crisis
11/05/2020 11:41No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu11/05/2020 11:4111.05.2020

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), an expert group under the Convention and the Paris Agreement mandated to provide technical support and advice to developing countries on MRV and transparency has rolled out some of the planned capacity building initiatives for 2020 despite the COVID-19 crisis.

The CGE planned a number of capacity building initiatives for its 2020 workplan such as regional webinar training sessions on transitioning from the revised 1996 to 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories, regional webinar trainings on ICTU and NDC progress tracking; training session on institutional arrangement to support MRV and ETF process. To this extent the CGE has already conducted webinars on transitioning from the revised 1996 to 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories for the Asia-Pacific region, which was conducted on 22 April 2020. A total of 44 experts attended the webinar and this presents an example of concrete effort by the CGE to assist developing countries enhance their technical capacity to prepare for and implement reporting requirement under the Convention and Paris Agreement.
Learn more about the webinar by following the presentations, the recordings and the initial questions and answers during the webinar.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Text Box: The 3rd Consultative Group of Experts Meeting held on 18 to 19 February 2020 in Bonn
 
 
  
​The Consultative Group of Experts held its 3rd Meeting from 18 to 19 February 2020 in Bonn, Germany.
11/05/2020 10:45No presence informationMutisungilire Kachulu11/05/2020 10:5511.05.2020

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), mandated to provide technical support and advice to developing countries to improve capacities to implement the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the ETF under the Paris Agreement, held its 3rd Meeting from 18 to 19 February 2020 in Bonn, Germany. To this end, the CGE formulated its Vision, Mission statement and Strategic objectives to guide its work up to 2026. The CGE’s Vision is to comprehensively achieve its mandate of assisting developing country Parties improve their capacities to implement the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the ETF under the Paris Agreement in a timely and sustainable manner.  The CGE’s Mission Statement seeks to provide targeted technical support and advice, consistent with its mandate, to developing country Parties that responds to their technical assistance needs to implement, in a timely manner, the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement, including putting in place sustainable institutional arrangements and data management systems.

  
The CGE successfully held its 2nd Pilot Informal Forum at COP 25, on on on institutionalization of data management system.  Country experiences were shared by Thailand, Indonesia and Australia
20/12/2019 14:44Justice Khumela20/12/2019 14:4420.12.2019

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) successfully held its 2nd Pilot Informal Forum on the margins of the twenty-fifth session of UN Climate Change Conference (COP 25). The CGE collaborated with the Paris Committee on Capacity-Building (PCCB) and was organized as part of the “Transparency Day” at the Capacity-building Hub on 5 December 2019. The focus of the second pilot informal forum was on institutionalization of data management system.
The 2nd forum convened with opening statements by the Chair of the CGE, Mr. Gervais Ludovic Itsoua Madzous and Co-Chair of the PCCB, Ms. Marzena Chodor, and introductory remarks by the Chair of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation, Mr. Emmanuel Dumisani Dlamini, the Deputy Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC secretariat, Mr. Ovais Sarmad and COP25 Presidency, Ms. Carolina Urmeneta.
To set the scene, the CGE Chair, Mr. Itsoua Madzous, provided an overview of the work that the CGE undertook in 2019 to develop technical capacity of developing countries to institutionalize data management for their national GHG inventories. He also presented the key findings from the assessment undertaken this year by the CGE to better understand the existing and emerging constraints, needs and gaps in relation to implementing the existing measurement, reporting and verification arrangements under the Convention and preparing for the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement.
Country experiences and lessons learned to institutionalize data management systems were presented by Indonesia, Mr. Joko Prihatno and Australia, Mr. Aaron Kirby. They provided concrete examples of how data management is institutionalized through live demonstrations of their data management systems. They also shared their experiences and lessons learned in developing and maintaining such systems, including key success factors that benefited the process of institutionalizing data management, key challenges and constraints faced in the process, and how the countries overcame them and what remains to be addressed. The data management systems that were demonstrated in the forum included:
 
-       Indonesia: SIGN-SMART (a web-based GHG data management system) and SRN or National Public Registry System (a web-based data management system for tracking mitigation and adaptation actions and support);
      
In addition, Thailand who has recently set up their GHG inventory system (TGEIS) in collaboration with Australia, also shared their experiences.
In the discussion and exchange session, participants shared experiences and lessons learned, which included:  
 
·      How putting in place a national data management system and institutionalizing data collection and management led to benefits beyond reporting under the UNFCCC process. The data management system can result in a robust data and flexibility in terms of archiving and documentation of the data. Further, it helps to communicate with broader stakeholders, which then contributes to getting support on MRV process.
 
·      Governance system and leadership, including legal and regulatory frameworks that mandate regular reporting and establishment of national data management system, was identified as key success factors. It is vital not only for setting up the national data management system, but for its operationalization, especially when there is lack of readiness or willingness of sectoral agencies and various levels of stakeholders (i.e. local and/or provincial levels) to use the established data management system and provide the required input data.
 
·      In terms of the design of the national data management system, it is important to incorporate the system into a broader national inventory plan. In case a country has separate sectoral data collection/reporting systems, it is important to integrate them into the national system and ensure the consistent flow of data and information without duplicative work.
 
 
If you missed the event, the presentations can be obtained here.
Keep following our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
 
 
  
Presenters at the side-event. From left to right:  government of Lebanon (Ms. Yara Daou Chalfoun); the government of Chile (Mr. Richard Martinez Caro); GEF (Ms. Milena Gonzalez Vasquez); Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (Mr. Henning Wuester); UNFCCC secretariat (Mr. William Agyemang-Bonsu); UNEP/UNDP GSP (Mr. Damiano Borgogno); and Global Green Growth Institute (Mr. Gebru Jember Endalew).
18/12/2019 15:45Justice Khumela18/12/2019 15:4518.12.2019

An event showcasing the efforts, including experiences and lessons learned, of Chile and Lebanon to strengthen their institutional arrangements and governance structures to support implementation of the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) was held on 5 December 2019 on the margins of 25th session of the Conference of the Parties in Madrid, Spain.  The event also included representatives from international agencies and programmes (Initiative for Climate Action Transparency, Joint UN Environment/UNDP Global Support Programme, the Global Environment Facility and Global Green Growth Institute) who are actively involved in supporting developing countries to share their perspective, including experiences and lessons learned, and support opportunities available from them.
The modalities, procedures and guidelines (MPGs) adopted in Katowice, provide the operational details for the ETF.  The MPGs are applicable to all Parties to the Paris Agreement with flexibility to those developing country Parties that need it in the light of their capacities. This is a significant shift in the UNFCCC process as the ETF builds on and enhances the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention, including the need to report information on climate action and support biennially. This necessitates having in place sustainable and functional national institutional arrangements.  Recognizing such a need, a number of developing country Parties are starting to enhance their efforts to improve their institutional arrangements with support from international community.
Lebanon shared their experience of how they built their institutional arrangements for reporting over time as they delivered four national communications and three BURs.  They encountered challenges with respect to institutionalizing data collection; addressing data gaps, and undertaking quality control and quality assurance measures to validate the data and the reports produced.  They started to address these by piloting a data sharing agreement between the Ministry of Environment and another ministry and thereafter expanded the approach to include other ministries.  They highlighted that stakeholder involvement is key.  Further, building human resource capacity within the country helped stabilize the reporting process.
Over time, Chile was able to put in place two key institutional arrangements that supported them to produce three national communications and three BURs to date: the Inter-Ministerial Technical Team on Climate Change (ETICC) and the National GHG Inventory System of Chile (SNICHILE). The ETICC is a cross government body that includes experts from ministries and their other institutes, coordinated by Ministry of Environment.  Similarly, SNICHILE is a decentralized body that includes the Ministry of Energy and Agriculture and is coordinated by Ministry of Environment. Chile explained that in order to strengthen institutional arrangements over time, it is important to take stock of gaps, needs and constraints and to seek support. They currently have a Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT) project to strengthen their institutional arrangements for National Determined Contribution and ETF.
Other presenters shared an overview of the scope and depth of support provided to developing countries for effective participation in the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and in terms of preparedness for participation in the ETF.
The GEF shared information on the programming status of the CBIT. So far, 59 CBIT projects were approved to the total value of 91 million USD. Of these, 29 projects have begun implementation. 80% of CBIT projects aim to enhance institutional arrangements. The GEF said that a single body responsible for overall coordination and management of the climate change reporting process which is well-located within a government ministry and having sufficient capacity and authority to carry out its role was the key pillar around which further institutional strengthening could be achieved.
ICAT explained that its objective is to provide policymakers around the world with tools and support tailored to country-needs for enhanced transparency and to assess the effectiveness of their countrys climate policies and actions in line with the Paris Agreement. ICAT has published a road-map for establishing information systems for climate action and support to help countries set-up information systems to meet their climate change reporting needs. They highlighted that buy-in from stakeholders; drafting regulatory and procedural documents for the operationalization of the institutional framework for reporting; and developing an integrated data management system were key to setting up a robust system for reporting.
The Global Support Programme (GSP) jointly implemented by UN Environment and UNDP and funded by the GEF, discussed the support provided to some developing countries to strengthen the capacity of the single body responsible for overall coordination and management of the climate change reporting process. The GSP highlighted that high-level political buy-in was important to cement inter-ministerial coordination.
The Global Green Growth Institute said that it was important that countries move away from the project-based approach that does not improve institutional memory or build long term capacity within government to meet climate change reporting needs to more permanent institutional arrangements. This is especially so because the enhanced transparency framework and its MPGs have many more shall’’ (mandatory) requirements for preparing biennial transparency reports that will require a more robust reporting system. GGGI have successfully assisted few countries in doing exactly that.
 
If you missed the event, the presentations can be obtained here https://seors.unfccc.int/applications/seors/reports/events_list.html
Keep following our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
 
  
Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary, opens the 8th workshop of the Facilitative sharing of views
12/12/2019 11:38Justice Khumela12/12/2019 11:3812.12.2019

UN Climate Change News, 11 December 2019 – At the UN Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Madrid, fifteen countries presented the latest information on their climate actions at events called the Facilitative Sharing of Views (FSV) and Multilateral Assessment (MA).   
 
Operating since 2014, the MA and FSV processes provide multilateral platforms for countries to share the latest information on their climate actions and engage in a constructive exchange of views. These processes play a crucial role in building trust among countries by enhancing the transparency of climate actions, thereby allowing countries to track progress of implementation and raise ambition levels.
 
In her opening remarks at the FSV workshop, UNFCCC Executive Secretary, Patricia Espinosa, said:
 
“It is becoming clearer than ever how transparency is central to increasing climate action. Ensuring data is shared openly is vital to our collective climate change efforts. When we see what is working in one country, we are more likely to try it in our own, if it’s applicable. This transparency directly helps inform governments as they increase levels of ambition to tackle climate change.”
 
Facilitative Sharing of Views
 
At the 8th session of the FSV workshop, five developing countries - Chile, Ghana, India, Malaysia and Saudi Arabia – shared their achievements and remaining challenges in climate action.
 
The latest FSV workshop demonstrated strengthened efforts by developing countries in addressing climate change. The discussion highlighted various policies and measures being actively implemented by developing countries, including carbon pricing, low-carbon electricity generation and sustainable forest management.  
 
Countries also noted that developing the biennial update report (BUR) and participating in the international consultation and analysis (ICA) have been beneficial to strengthen their capacity in tracking progress of mitigation actions and increase awareness. 
 
COP25 President and Minister of Environment of Chile, Carolina Schmidt, said: “Data and transparency are core elements for driving commitments and increasing ambition.” She also added: “The international consultation and analysis (ICA) and facilitative sharing of views (FSV) have particular importance not only to establish dialogue, but also to understand areas for improvement and approaches to overcome potential gaps.”
 
See here for highlights of the presentations made by these five countries.
 
 
Multilateral Assessment
 
Ten developed countries - Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus , Greece, Kazakhstan, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Portugal and Switzerland - shared their experiences with climate actions this week at the sessions on transparency in Madrid known as Multilateral Assessment.
        
 
Underlining the importance of the MA sessions, Kyriakos Psychas, Head of the Climate Change Department of the Ministry of Environment and Energy in Greece, said: “The Multilateral assessment process is a pillar for transparency and robust reporting.”
 
The sessions showcased the concrete climate actions developed Parties are taking to meet their 2020 emission reduction targets, which are crucial to achieving the goal of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.
 
The sessions showed how climate actions are improving as countries integrate lessons learned, and that the portfolio of climate actions continues to expand as countries progress towards meeting their strong political commitments for 2020 and beyond. 
 
Not only the 2020 climate action targets were on show; countries referred to their 2030 targets under the Paris Agreement, demonstrating that the short-term 2020 targets are essential stepping stones to reaching the mid- and longer-term targets.
 
Some countries also outlined their ambitious goals for carbon neutrality by 2050. For example, Portugal and Switzerland presented their 2050 net zero emissions targets. Eduardo Ferreira Santos, Head of the Department for Climate Change at the Portuguese Environment Agency said: “The next decade is crucial in terms of emissions reduction and climate policy and trajectory that puts us on track to 2050”. See video from Portugal here: http://bit.ly/2LM7Iww
        
Novel approaches to tackling transportation emissions were also presented, such as free public transit (Luxembourg) and consideration of including road fuel into emissions trading systems (Austria).
 
For more information, please visit http://unfccc.int/ICA and http://unfccc.int/IAR
  
5 December 2019, 18:00 - 20:00
26/11/2019 16:32Justice Khumela03/12/2019 14:1026.11.2019

The enhanced transparency framework of the Paris Agreement (ETF) requires that all developing country Parties submit their biennial transparency repots, at the latest, by 31 December 2024. The availability and quality of the data will determine the credibility of the information provided. While most developing countries have experience, at least once, in compiling data for the preparation of their national greenhouse gas inventories, through their experience in preparing national communications (NCs) and in some cases the biennial update reports (BURs), constraints and challenges continue to exist.
 
Data-related challenges are the most prevalent challenges faced by developing countries.  These challenges fall in two broad categories: primary data collected and data management.  The challenges around the primary data collection stems from either lack of access to or unavailability of primary data or available data not in the suitable format or lack of human resource capacity or the technical infrastructure needed to support the data collection process.  Similar challenges associated with the data management are mainly due to lack of human resource capacity or the technical infrastructure for data management, quality control and quality assurance (QA/QC), documentation and archiving.
 
Recognizing these challenges, the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) will host its 2nd Pilot Informal Forum entitled “Institutionalizing data management system” on 5 December at COP 25. The event is being organized in collaboration with the Paris Committee on Capacity-Building and will be one of the events held at the Capacity-building Hub on the “Transparency day”.
 
The pilot forum is aimed at increasing awareness of the importance of institutionalizing GHG data management; promoting exchange of best practices, practical experiences and lessons learned in   institutionalizing GHG data management; and further improving understanding of constraints and challenges, and the depth and needs for further capacity-building efforts.
 
To set the scene, the CGE will present the findings from its assessment undertaken in 2019 to better understand the existing and emerging constraints, needs and gaps in relation to the existing MRV arrangements and the enhanced transparency framework. It will be followed by the presentations from Indonesia and Australia showcasing their success stories and lessons learned in establishing and institutionalizing their national GHG inventory systems.
 
 
Date: Thursday, 5 December 2019
Time: 18:00 – 20:00
Location: Capacity-building Hub
  
Figure 3: Number of nationally appropriate mitigation action entries in the registry by type
from 2013 to 2019
22/11/2019 16:39Justice Khumela22/11/2019 16:3922.11.2019
 

UN Climate Change News, 20 November 2019 - The UNFCCC NAMA registry recorded an additional 13 NAMA (nationally appropriate mitigation action) entries in between 1 October 2018 and 30 September 2019, mostly seeking support for preparation and implementation of plans to curb greenhouse gas emissions.
 
NAMAs refer to any action that reduces emissions in developing countries and is prepared under the umbrella of a national governmental initiative. They can be policies directed at transformational change within an economic sector, or actions across sectors for a broader national focus.
 
As at 30 September 2019, the UNFCCC NAMA registry contained a total of 183 NAMAs seeking support for preparation or implementation or seeking recognition, representing an increase of 8 per cent since 2018.
 
Annual Report on Registry of NAMAs to Be Considered at COP25
 
The UNFCCC Secretariat has released the seventh annual report on the operation of the registry of nationally appropriate mitigation actions for consideration by the UNFCCC’s Conference of Parties (COP25) in Madrid, Spain in December 2019.
 
This report provides information on the operation of the registry in the reporting period (1 October 2018 to 30 September 2019) and in terms of the cumulative status of NAMA entries in the registry as at 30 September 2019.
 
The report highlights that Ecuador submitted the largest number of entries (5), followed by South Africa (3), Iran (2), Bangladesh (1), Dominican Republic (1) and Guatemala (1) in the reporting period. Of the 13 NAMA entries, 7 sought support for implementation, 1 sought support for preparation and 5 sought recognition. These NAMAs mostly targeted energy supply, agriculture, transport and infrastructure and residential and commercial buildings sectors and sought a total of USD 15.78 billion in international support
 
As in previous reporting periods, financial support made up the greatest share of international support sought (USD 15.7 billion), followed by capacity-building support (USD 62 million) and technological support (USD 14.5 million).
 
Latin American and Caribbean States recorded the most NAMA entries. However, the substantial number of NAMA entries recorded by African States, Asia-Pacific States, SIDS and the LDCs was particularly noteworthy.
 
On the international support being sought for NAMAs, the document reports a cumulative total of USD 31.5 billion in international support sought by all NAMA entries for implementing or preparing NAMAs. Financial support continued to make up the greatest share of international support sought (USD 29.5 billion), followed by technological support (USD 1.7 billion) and capacity-building support (USD 0.21 billion).
 
  
The workshop for Asia-Pacific and Eastern Europe, held in Siem Reap, Cambodia.
17/10/2019 16:14Justice Khumela17/10/2019 16:1417.10.2019

The Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) conducted three regional hands-on training workshops in 2019 on institutionalization of data management for the national greenhouse gas inventory. The workshops were conducted for three regions: Africa; Latin America and the Caribbean; and Asia-Pacific and Eastern Europe.

The aim of the workshops was to enhance the technical capacity of national experts involved in the preparation of national communications, biennial update reports and national greenhouse gas inventories to institutionalize data management in their national institutional arrangements.
The workshops covered a wide variety of issues and problem areas to data that are among the most persistent challenges faced by developing countries in their implementation of the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and preparation for the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement. Data issues manifest in various ways – lack of availability of data that are consistent with the reporting guidelines, inaccessible data, lack of adequate data collection and management process and/or system.
 The workshops also introduced for the first time a pre-workshop webinar and homework exercise that allowed participants to already have basic knowledge of the topic prior to the workshop. In addition, the workshop provided an opportunity for experts to work on simulated cases, which equipped the participants with hands-on experience on handling cases.
Another key aspect of the workshops was creating a platform for collaboration and interacting with their peers, CGE members and other experts. This includes sharing of views, lessons learned and experience relating to institutional arrangements for data collection and data management processes, including commonly used techniques, approaches and tools. The participants also expressed interest in enhancing regional collaboration on the institutionalization of data for GHG inventories on the basis of similarities in national circumstances in the region, noting the potential for sharing best practices, resources and expertise with a view to overcoming common challenges.

In general, the workshops were successful in:

(a)          Familiarizing national experts with the process and methods for institutionalization of data management for the national GHG inventory;
(b)          Providing a platform for national experts from the same region to share experience and lessons learned;
(c)           Promoting networking among national experts;
(d)          Providing a platform for the CGE to interact with national experts and gain insight into relevant lessons learned, experience, constraints and challenges.
Some participants expressed their intention to use the training materials as a basis for training other national experts, enhancing existing institutional arrangements, furthering their knowledge of GHG inventory preparation and improving their terms of reference for hired experts and consultants.
Participants expressed interest in learning more about enhancing existing institutional arrangements to improve the collection, management and reporting of GHG inventory data, including incorporating GHG inventory component into the existing data collection and management systems and processes in sectors so that proper data for the inventory can be generated in a timely manner.
The workshops were attended by 106 experts from 91 developing country Parties. The CGE members from the respective regions also participated in these workshops, which allowed them to gain first-hand knowledge on the technical capacity of the national experts.
 
More information about the CGE can be found here:  https://unfccc.int/CGE
 Details about the workshop are available here: http://bit.ly/2nBlFoe
  
The Asia-Pacific Regional NDC Dialogue which took place at the Asia-Pacific Climate Week in Bangkok.
17/10/2019 14:36Justice Khumela17/10/2019 14:3617.10.2019

A forum for peer-to-peer exchange on nationally determined contributions (NDC)
 
UN Climate Change in collaboration with the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and other partners have overseen three Regional Dialogues this year: Africa; Latin America and the Caribbean; and Asia-Pacific.
The Regional Dialogues are a series of regional workshops which were launched in 2014 to provide a forum for peer-to-peer exchange on the design of intended NDCs, before transitioning to address issues of the nationally determined contributions (NDC) preparation and implementation.
The goal of the dialogues is to increase momentum for more ambitious and accelerated climate action and for enhanced NDCs. In doing so, the events serve as a contribution to the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Action Summit which took place in September 2019 and for COP 25.
This year, the Regional Dialogues’ objectives were enhancing capacities to prepare to update their NDCs; to identify solutions to specific challenges countries are facing in implementing and enhancing their NDCs; to provide a forum for peer-to-peer learning and exchange of national experiences related to NDC implementation and enhancement; and to provide a platform for linking national/regional interests with the international NDC process, and for strengthening existing and/or establishing new partnerships and commitments for ambitious climate action that help meet the goals of the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda.
Africa Regional NDC Dialogue in Accra, Ghana, 18-19 March
The first Regional Dialogue of the year took place in Accra, Ghana from 18 to 19 March with 89 participants from 47 countries and 69 participants from partners and donors attending.
Latin America and Caribbean Regional NDC Dialogue in Salvador, Brazil, 19-20 August
The Regional Dialogue for Latin America and the Caribbean took place from 19 to 20 August in Salvador, Brazil with 77 participants from 25 countries and 71 participants from partners and donors.
Asia-Pacific Regional NDC Dialogue in Bangkok, Thailand, 2-3 September
The Asia-Pacific Regional NDC Dialogue was the last dialogue of the 2019 series and took place during the Asia-Pacific Climate Week in Bangkok, Thailand from 2 to 3 September.
115 participants from 37 countries and 64 participants from partners and donors attended the two-day dialogue.
  
The second training workshop in the series was organized for the African region, from 16 to 18 September, in Algiers, Algeria, with support from the Algerian Government and UNDP country office in Algeria. The training workshop gathered 47 national experts who are involved in the preparation of national GHG inventory from 37 countries in the region and technical resource persons from the Greenhouse Gas Management Institute.
02/10/2019 10:57Justice Khumela02/10/2019 10:5702.10.2019

Building a sustainable national MRV system and moving towards the enhanced transparency framework.

Issues related to data are among the most persistent challenges faced by developing countries in their implementation of the existing measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention and preparation for the enhanced transparency framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement. Data issues manifest in various ways – lack of availability of data that are consistent with the reporting guidelines, inaccessible data, lack of adequate data collection and management process and/or system.
 
To help developing countries tackle data issues and enhance MRV efforts at the national level, the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE) decided to focus its technical assistance and capacity-building activities for 2019 on data issues and organize a series of regional hands-on training workshops on institutionalization of data management for the national GHG inventory.
 
The second training workshop in the series was organized for the African region, from 16 to 18 September, in Algiers, Algeria, with support from the Algerian Government and UNDP country office in Algeria. The training workshop gathered 47 national experts who are involved in the preparation of national GHG inventory from 37 countries in the region and technical resource persons from the Greenhouse Gas Management Institute.
 
The training workshop addressed key elements required to ensure the sustainability of GHG inventory process, including system design, governance, quality data, documentation and archiving and stakeholder engagement. Designed as part of a 4-phase programme (pre-workshop webinar – homework – hands-on training workshop – post-workshop webinar), the training workshop provided opportunities for national experts to learn, test and practice a handful of techniques, approaches and tools.
 
The participants engaged in the hands-on exercises and group discussions with great passion and eager to deepen their knowledge and skills and prompted the exchange of experiences and lessons learned including concrete proposals that they could further take up to improve the national GHG inventory management system. The training workshop ended on a note of general satisfaction.
 
The last training workshop in the 2019 series is planned for the Asia-Pacific and Eastern European regions from 7 to 9 October 2019, in Siem Reap, Cambodia.
 
For more details on CGE training workshops 2019, see here.
For more information on CGE and its work plan for 2019, see here.
  
With the adoption of the Paris Agreement the and the Katowice Climate Package, the efforts of parties to further enhance the transparency of climate action and support will be increased significantly. This will be achieved through the enhanced transparency framework (ETF), established under the Paris Agreement, that builds on and enhanced the existing measurement, reporting and verification arrangements (MRV) under the Convention As a result, there is a wide acknowledgement by the global community that developing countries will require increased financial, technical and capacity-building support.
08/07/2019 15:51Laure Fouchecourt08/07/2019 15:5108.07.2019

Speakers from left to right: Henning Wuster (ICAT), Milena Gonzalez vasquez (GEF), Minyoung Kim (UNFCCC-GIR-CASTT), William Agyemang-Bonsu (UNFCCC Secretariat), John Christensen (UNEP DTU Partnership).

With the adoption of the Paris Agreement and the Katowice Climate Package, the efforts of Parties to further enhance the transpanrency of climate action and support will be increased significantly. This will be achieved through the enhanced transparency framework (ETF), established under the Paris Agreement, that builds on and enhanced the existing measurement, reporting and verification arrangements (MRV) under the Convention As a result, there is a wide acknowledgement by the global community that developing countries will require increased financial, technical and capacity-building support.
A side-event, in the form of a panel discussion, showcasing the support (financial, technical, and capacity-building) provided to developing countries for participation in the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and the ETF  under the Paris Agreement, was held on Monday 24 June on the margins of June 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn.
The panel discussion, moderated by the UNFCCC secretariat, included a panel of experts involved actively in supporting developing countries in this area.  The experts provided their perspective of how countries can use the ETF as part of their efforts to implement and further develop their NDCs.  They also shared key lessons learned and best practices in ensuring that the support provided contributes to the sustainability of the national MRV arrangements and helps countries as they move towards implementing the ETF.
Ms. Milena Gonzalez Vasquez (Global Environment Facility) presented the financial and technical support opportunities made available through the GEF, including the Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency – a funding window established in response to the request from COP 21 and plans for support for preparation of biennial transparency reports. She highlighted that developing countries could submit projects that help strengthen and prioritize their capacity to implement the enhanced transparency framework. The CBIT database contains a publicly list of projects submitted to date. As of June 2019, 48 projects received US$74 million of CBIT funds, with 17 projects in the implementation phase.
Mr. Stanford Mwakasonda provided further details on the on-the-ground support provided through the GEF-funded Global Support Programme.  The programme, implemented jointly by UN Environment and UNDP, provides support to developing countries to meet their national communications and biennial update reports reporting needs. He emphasized that it is important for countries to establish a legal framework (an overarching climate change policy, strategy or act) that provides the basis for legally defining the role of stakeholders such as universities and national statistics offices can play in the national MRV system.
Ms. Minyoung Kim of the Greenhouse Gas inventory & Research Center of Korea (UNFCCC-GIR CASTT) described the specific support measure offered, in partnership with UNFCCC, to developing countries to build their expertise in establishing or improving their national GHG inventories. She explained that the training programme covers aspects such as the reporting and technical analysis process under the UNFCCC, GHG inventory compilation including sectoral GHG estimation methodologies and development of country-specific GHG emission factors
Mr. Henning Wuester described the country-tailored tools and support made available to policy-makers and national experts by the Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (ICAT)to assess the impacts of their climate policies and actions; to develop effective and ambitious climate policies; and to mobilize investment. He provided examples of the support initiatives they have undertaken for developing countries in the past for developing reporting capacity such as the development of sustainable land and land use indicators for the land use sector.
Mr. John Christensen highlighted the range of tools (legal, institutional, procedural and capacity-building) made available by the UNEP DTU Partnership to support developing countries build a national system for implementing the enhanced transparency framework.
The panellists explained that their webpages contain information on how to access their support offering and highlighted that tools and guidance documents are freely available on their websites. 
Follow our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
  
The Consultative Group of Expert (CGE), on the margins of the June 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn, Germany, organized a side-event to present its 2019 CGE work plan and also highlight how it is responding to the needs arising from the enhanced transparency framework.
08/07/2019 15:42Laure Fouchecourt08/07/2019 15:4208.07.2019

The Consultative Group of Expert (CGE), on the margins of the June 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn, Germany, organized a side-event to present its 2019 CGE work plan and also highlight how it is responding to the needs arising from the enhanced transparency framework.

The group invited few countries to present their experiences and lessons learned in the process of preparing their national communications (NC) and/or biennial update reports (BURs), and how they are building on from those experiences and lessons learned to prepare for the enhanced transparency framework (ETF).
The CGE Chair, Mr. Gervais Ludovic Istoua Madzou (Congo), presented the 2019 work plan of the CGE,  which addresses the capacity-building needs of developing countries in a more targeted and strategic manner, in order to  facilitate improved reporting of developing countries over time and support the implementation of the ETF under Article 13 of the Paris Agreement.
Since February 2019, as part of its work plan, the CGE has already launched several activities, such as a targeted survey to developing countries to better understand their needs for implementing the MRV arrangements and the ETF, a toolbox on institutional arrangements to support MRV/transparency of climate action and support, technical guide to prepare for the implementation of the ETF, and the regional hands-on training workshops on institutionalization data management for GHG inventories.
Bangladesh, Jamaica and South Africa shared their experiences and lessons learned on the existing MRV arrangements, and also provided an update on how efforts being undertaken nationally to prepare for the implementation of the ETF.
Jamaica has submitted its first Biennial Update Report (BUR) in 2016 which went through the technical analysis and Facilitative Sharing of Views (FSV) in the same year.  It submitted its third National Communication (NC) in 2018 and , In the context of preparing these reports, two key challenges were highlighted, which were limited technical and human capacity to complete the reports, and inability to disburse resources in original project timeframe. In order to address these challenges, Jamaica received technical and financial support through the United National Development Programme and the Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT). Despite these challenges, Jamaica plans to submit its second BUR and fourth NC in 2020-2022.  It also aims to put in place a robust national MRV system from 2021-2022.
Bangladesh submitted its third NC in 2018.  The presentation highlighted some of the challenges and lessons learned from the process of preparing this report.  Lack of reliable data and information consistent with the requirements of the IPCC 2006 guidelines, lack of institutional capacity and dependence on external experts, and issues to retain sectoral specialist that were trained in the process of preparing these reports were identified as some of the challenges it is facing currently. With a view to addressing these challenges, Bangladesh aims to establish data sharing arrangements at the national level, including a permanent structure at the department of environment which had the mandated to prepare the NCs and BURs. In order to prepare itself for the implementation of the ETF, Bangladesh will build on and enhance the existing institutional arrangement, and plans to use the guidelines and tools, which will be developed by CGE. Bangladesh called for an increased financial and technical support to institutionalize the proposed MRV arrangements, update its National Determined Contributions (NDCs), and prepare their first Biennial Transparency Report (BTR).
South Africa, one of the five countries that has submitted its third BUR, shared its experiences, challenges and lessons learned. With regard to challenges, the following were identified: limited number of and high turnover of key staff members, issues with data management, capacity constraints in using the national GHG inventory information management systems, lack of disaggregated data for the GHG reporting, and a non-centralized information system for climate finance. Efforts to address these challenges include: recruiting sector specialists to compile GHG inventory data, conducting capacity-building for key personnel, formalizing data collection processes, and developing a climate change tracking and evaluation system, which included tracking of climate finance. The presentation also highlighted how the National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reporting Regulations, published in April 2017, formalized the institutional arrangements to ensure consistent and sustainable data input for the GHG inventory. In order to prepare for the ETF, South Africa will continue using the 2006 IPCC guideline, and will set up higher tier methodologies for key categories in country specific emission factor. South Africa also provided a preliminary list of actions that it aims to undertake in its effort to prepare for the implementation of the ETF.
Follow our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
  
In the framework of the 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn, Germany, the secretariat held a special event on Wednesday 20 June, on the transparency framework showcasing the experience and lessons learned from the current measurement, reporting and verification system (MRV) to help implement the Enhanced Transparency Framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement.
21/06/2019 11:52Laure Fouchecourt21/06/2019 11:5221.06.2019
In the framework of the 2019 Climate Change Conference (SB50) in Bonn, Germany, the secretariat held a special event on Wednesday 20 June, on the transparency framework showcasing the experience and lessons learned from the current measurement, reporting and verification system (MRV) to help implement the Enhanced Transparency Framework (ETF) under the Paris Agreement.
 
Check the video on the event here
Learn more here
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The CGE, has so far in 2016, conducted five thematic webinars, 3 on vulnerability and adaptation assessment, and 2 on mitigation assessment. These webinars are part of the groups its capacity-building initiatives. An additional four webinars are also being planned for 2016.
20/05/2016 09:29No presence informationRoberto Felix04/11/2019 09:2120.05.2016

The CGE, has so far in 2016, conducted five thematic webinars, 3 on vulnerability and adaptation assessment, and 2 on mitigation assessment. These webinars are part of the groups its capacity-building initiatives.  An additional four webinars are also being planned for 2016.

The topics for the vulnerability and adaptation assessment webinars focused on the framework for assessment, climate change scenarios, and water resources.  The mitigation webinars focused on the key steps to conduct a mitigation assessment, and the key mitigation challenges and barriers faced in the sector of energy supply.

A total of 174 persons participated in the three vulnerability and adaptation assessment webinars and 80 participated in two mitigation assessment webinars.  Participants included national government representatives, researchers, and technical specialists. The webinars allowed participants to learn and engage with experts remotely and to submit questions where experts provided detailed responses immediately. The presentations were also made available online to users.

In the last quarter of 2016, the CGE will organized webinars in in French and Spanish.  


More details will be provided closer to the webinar dates!

  
The UNFCCC Secretariat hosted The Africa Regional Workshop on the Building of Sustainable National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Management Systems, and the Use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories
20/05/2016 09:40No presence informationRoberto Felix22/08/2016 11:3120.05.2016

The UNFCCC Secretariat hosted The Africa Regional Workshop on the Building of Sustainable National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Management Systems, and the Use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories from 14 to 18 March in Maseru, Lesotho. The workshop was organized by the UNFCCC Secretariat in collaboration with the Technical Support Unit of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories and the Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention.

 

A total of 57 experts from 41 countries in the region attended the workshop. The participants primarily consisted of government officials involved in the preparation of national GHG inventories, including UNFCCC national focal points.

 

The workshop was the first of its kind from the UNFCCC Secretariat, offering training on the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for non-Annex I Parties. The workshop was organized following the 42nd Subsidiary Body for Implementation acknowledging the request from non-Annex I Parties for further technical support aimed at improving their domestic capacity to facilitate continuity in meeting reporting requirements through, among others, training on the use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National GHG Inventories, as well as building of sustainable national GHG inventory management systems.

 

Therefore, the workshop emphasized both the importance of establishing a national inventory management system to support the regular development and submission of national GHG gas inventories, and provided hands-on training on the 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories, including the IPCC inventory software. 

 

The workshop consisted of six sessions. The first session included a keynote address by the Honorable Minister Selibe Mochoboroane, Minister of Energy and   Meteorology (Lethotho), and the sharing of country experiences by representatives of Benin, South Africa, Swaziland, and Tunisia.

 

The second session focused on the key role of the national GHG inventory management system, including presentations and hands on materials to support the development of a national GHG inventory management system. This session concluded with a group discussion where participants shared their experiences in using the proposed templates.

 

Sessions three through five provided training on the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, including general guidance, reporting, and sectoral guidance. Following an overview of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, including differences between the Revised 1996 and the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, participants were introduced to the IPCC inventory software and Emission Factor Database. The IPCC 2006 Guidelines were presented by sector —Energy, Industrial Processes and Product Use, Waste, and Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use. For each sector, participants reviewed source/sink categories and methodologies, and completed a hands-on exercise using the IPCC inventory software. Participants then learned how to utilize the IPCC inventory software for compiling various components of a national GHG inventory.

 

The UNFCCC Secretariat is organizing similar workshops for the Latin America and Caribbean, and Asia Pacific and Eastern Europe regions, in June and September 2016, respectively. 

 

Presentations from the workshop are available on the UNFCCC website: http://unfccc.int/national_reports/non-annex_i_natcom/meetings/items/655.php

 

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The Ministry of the Environment of Japan and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) convened, together with the Ministry of Environment, Green Development and Tourism of Mongolia, the “14th Workshop on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories in Asia (WGIA14)” from 26 to 28 July 2016 in Mongolia’s capital city, Ulaanbaatar.
25/08/2016 16:45No presence informationJoseph Peter Ndimu25/08/2016 16:5925.08.2016

The Ministry of the Environment of Japan and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) convened, together with the Ministry of Environment, Green Development and Tourism of Mongolia, the “14th Workshop on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories in Asia (WGIA14)” from 26 to 28 July 2016 in Mongolia’s capital city, Ulaanbaatar. The main purpose of the annual workshop was to  develop and improve national GHG inventories in the Asian region and to enhance cooperative relationships as a means of achieving this.

93 participants attended WGIA14, including government and research institution representatives of thirteen countries (Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao P.D.R., Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Republic of Korea, Thailand and Vietnam), in addition to representatives of the Technical Support Unit of the IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and others.

Mutual learning sessions on GHG inventories were held during the workshop, and discussions took place on themes related to Biennial Update Reports (BURs) and to various activities with co-benefits for GHG inventories/mitigation and related support. In the mutual learning sessions, the following four GHG inventory sectors were taken up – Energy, Industrial Processes, Land Use, Land-Use Change and forestry (LULUCF) and Waste.

For each session, two countries engaged with each other by following up on the Q&A which had taken place over the course of two and a half months preceding the workshop. Experts and government officials in charge of the national inventory from the partnering countries met each other in person at the sessions, clarifying their questions and elaborating on their answers.

Through the mutual learning sessions, specific issues in the four inventory sectors were identified and some solutions were proposed. Common difficulties such as challenges in collecting activity data or achieving completeness in the coverage of sources/sinks, as well as institutional arrangement issues were acknowledged.

Following the mutual learning sessions, the following topics were taken up in the plenary sessions: 1) Updates on the National Communications and BURs from developing country Parties, 2) Institutional Arrangements for National GHG Inventories and BURs, 3) Good Practices in the International Consultation and Analysis (ICA) Process, and 4) Activities with co-benefits for GHG inventories/mitigation and related support.

firewood

Photo credit: Basharat Alam Shah

In Session 1), participants exchanged views on how to interpret UNFCCC decisions, and the practicalities of implementing them. It was acknowledged that the 2006 IPCC Guidelines reflect the latest scientific knowledge, but the transition to using them requires capacity building. In Session 2), the importance of coordinating between institutional arrangements for inventory preparation, mitigation planning and adaptation was highlighted. In Session 3), it was acknowledged that the ICA process contributes to enhancing transparency, and the capacity of countries to improve their GHG inventories, mitigation and emission reduction work, as well as to the next submission of BURs and Nationally Determined Contributions. In Session 4), participants reconfirmed the co-benefits between air pollution control, terrestrial monitoring and the enhancing of GHG inventories. Clarifications were also sought and provided for related support for the improvement of GHG inventories.

 

  
Register for the CGE e-learning courses by 1 September 2017! The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from non-Annex I Parties (CGE) has developed online e-learning courses to assist the preparation of national communications.
29/08/2017 12:08No presence informationBhava Dhungana29/08/2017 13:4129.08.2017

​Register for the CGE e-learning courses by 1 September 2017! The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from non-Annex I Parties (CGE) has developed online e-learning courses to assist the preparation of national communications. The e-courses are free of charge and are open to everyone. Participants have 3 months to complete the course and will receive a certificate upon completion. Please mail any questions to tisu@unfccc.int. Register for the e-courses here>> http://bit.ly/1Ex9GIC

  
As part of the Paris Agreement, Parties to the UNFCCC agreed to establish a Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT) to strengthen the institutional and technical capacities of developing countries to meet the enhanced transparency requirements of the Paris Agreement.
06/12/2017 11:48No presence informationMarlan Pillay01/11/2019 11:4106.12.2017
In order to strengthen the institutional and technical capacities of developing countries to meet the transparency requirements of the Paris Agreement, countries agreed to establish a Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT). The GEF was requested to support the establishment and operation of the CBIT, including through voluntary contributions to support developing countries during GEF-6 (2014- 2018) and future replenishment cycles.
The CBIT has three aims:
1.       Strengthen national institutions for transparency-related activities in line with national priorities
2.       Provide relevant tools, training and assistance for meeting the provisions stipulated in Article 13 of the Agreement Assist in the improvement of transparency over time
3.       Assist in the improvement of transparency over time
More information on the CBIT can be found here:
·         Video on the CBIT
·         Information leaflet on CBIT
All developing country Parties have access to the CBIT upon request. A list of projects approved under the CBIT can be found here: Projects under CBIT

 

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