Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
United Nations
Framework Convention on Climate Change
 
Attachments
  
  
Rollup Image
Description
  
  
  
  
Content
  
The first CGE hands-on workshop was held in Lomé, Togo from 23-26 July, 2018.
08/11/2018 11:59No presence informationAlexandra Trecha08/11/2018 11:5908.11.2018

The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE) held three regional hands-on training workshops on identifying and reporting adaptation actions in 2018 for Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention. The first workshop, for the African region, was held in Lomé, Togo from 23 to 26 July, the second, for the Latin American and Caribbean region, was held in Asunción, Paraguay, from 17 to 20 September, and the third, for the Asia-Pacific and Eastern European regions, was held in Kathmandu, Nepal, from 8 to 11 October.

The workshops were designed based on the CGEs assessment of the problems, constraints and lessons learned and best practices in the preparation of national communications (NCs) and biennial update reports (BURs), feedback from past workshop participants, and surveys conducted with the national focal points and NC and BUR coordinators. The CGE has identified that countries often lack rigorous and scientific assessment of vulnerability and adaptation (V&A), and thus the adaptation options/measures are generic. In most cases, countries face challenges in selecting appropriate and practical methodologies to their national circumstances and carrying out complete sectoral assessments. Furthermore, while a few countries have explored the possibility of conducting vulnerability and adaptation assessments in the context of preparation of NCs as an opportunity to integrate climate change responses into relevant national and sectoral policies, there is still a need to provide a broader picture of how the assessment of impacts and vulnerability to climate change can lead to adaptation options that can inform formulation of robust climate resilient sectoral policies, plans or programmes. 
Workshop Objectives
The objectives of the workshops were to enhance the technical knowledge of national experts on the science, methods and tools necessary for conducting vulnerability and adaptation assessments, translating the assessment results into adaptation actions and reporting the actions in their national communications. The workshops were similar in design and structure and several sessions were conducted at each. The following topics were covered through presentations and interactive hands-on exercises: 1) Big picture: global landscape of climate change impacts and action, 2) General steps in V&A assessments and frameworks, 3) Sectoral V&A assessment, planning and implementation, 4) Translating sectoral V&A assessment results into national policies and plans, 5) Reporting to the Convention, 6) Establishing or enhancing national institutional arrangements and 7) Peer exchange.
For the session on sectoral V&A assessment, planning and implementation, the following four sectors were presented: (i) water; (ii) coastal; (iii) health; and (iv) agriculture. These sectors were chosen through a survey amongst national focal points, NC and BUR coordinators to identify the interest and need of the countries.
Each presentation was followed by question and answer sessions and breakout group exercises based on case studies. These exercises generated an exchange of views and lessons learned during the process and allowed participants to gain a skill set for identifying adaptation actions and reporting them in NCs.
The workshops were designed to allow for flexibility on the level of detail. Before each regional workshop commenced, a pre-workshop survey was conducted to understand the level of experience of the participants and their expectations for the workshop, with the organizers using the findings to customize and adjust the level and approach of the sessions.  During the four days, participants and resource persons reviewed these expectations to ensure that the participants needs were met.
Participants Assessment and Feedback
Overall, the participants of the regional hands-on training workshops appreciated the opportunity to work with a set of methods and tools necessary to conduct V&A assessments through hands-on exercises. After each of the regional workshops, a post-workshop survey was conducted to assess if the workshop met the objectives and expectations of the participants as well as allowing the CGE to adjust and improve the content and approach for the workshop. The assessment also allows the CGE to adjust and improve the content and approach for the workshop. The response rates for the workshops were 76 per cent for the African region, 63 per cent for the Latin America and Caribbean, and 81 per cent for Asia-Pacific and Eastern European regions.
Per the survey results, most surveyed participants found the quality of the regional hands-on training workshops to be either excellent (42%, on average) or good (54%, on average). Participants found the content of the workshop to be either very relevant (41-48% for each session) or relevant (40-47%) to their daily work
Workshops Success
In general, the workshops were successful in several areas including: 1) Familiarization of the entire cycle of planning and conducting a V&A assessment, identifying adaptation options, decision-making and planning and reporting adaptation actions in NCs, 2) Serving as a platform for sharing experience and lessons learned among national experts from the same region, 3) Promoting networking among national experts, 4) Clarifying the context and mandate for developing countries to report information on adaptation in their NCs, and 5) Providing a platform for the CGE to interact with national experts and gain first-hand insight into lessons learned and experience as well as constraints and challenges countries are facing.
Appreciation
The CGE, the secretariat and participants expressed their appreciation to the Governments of Nepal, Paraguay and Togo for hosting the workshops. The CGE also extended its appreciation to RCC Lomé and to the UNDP country offices in Paraguay and Nepal for organizing the logistical arrangements for these workshops. The CGE thanked the resource persons from Alliance for Global Water Adaptation (AGWA), Deltares, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group II, the United Nations Development Programme National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme and the World Health Organization.The CGE thanked those developed country Parties included in Annex II to the Convention and other developed country Parties that provided financial resources for the workshops.
The full report on the regional workshops is available here.
The CGEs annual progress report to the Subsidiary Body for Implementation can be found here.
  
Two teams of technical experts, one in English and one Spanish, conducted the technical analysis of five Biennial Update Reports.
17/10/2018 11:20No presence informationAlexandra Trecha17/10/2018 11:2017.10.2018

Technical analysis of five further Biennial Update Reports was conducted.

The eleventh round of the technical analysis under the existing MRV framework for developing countries was held in Bonn, Germany, from 20 to 24 August 2018. Two teams of technical experts (TTE), one in English and one Spanish, conducted the technical analysis of five Biennial Update Reports (BURs) – three BUR2 submitted by Armenia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Uruguay, and two BUR1 submitted by Nigeria and Saudi Arabia.
 
Over the next nine months, the TTEs, in consultation with the Parties, will prepare the summary reports for each of those Parties analyzed. The information will capture the findings of the technical analysis, including capacity-building needs, aimed at enhancing the transparency of information reported in Parties’ BURs. Once published on the secretariat’s website, the reports will serve as input to the multilateral facilitative sharing of views process for these Parties.
 
Since the launch of the process in 2015, 57 BURs have been analyzed by a total of 152 experts, and 47 of these summary reports have been published.
 
A recent survey of Parties that have participated in the BUR technical analysis process shows, that the experiences and lessons learned from the BUR technical analysis process are significant in helping Parties prepare for their subsequent national reports. The interaction between the Party and the technical experts are very effective and the guidance received from the secretariat throughout the process is sufficient and helpful.
 
From the process management perspective, the secretariat strives to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the process through the development of both IT-and non-IT tools that aim to support the technical analysis process, as well as through enhancement of training activities and training material.
 
See further information on the technical analysis process.
  
The NDC Regional Dialogue convenes countries from the same region to share their approaches and experiences with NDC planning and implementation activities. One of the objectives is to identify opportunities for translating NDCs into concrete actions (in particular in the energy sector) to contribute to NDC goals.
26/07/2018 17:11Novita Syaputri26/07/2018 17:1126.07.2018

Since 2015, the UNFCCC secretariat and UNDP organize NDC Regional Dialogues to raise awareness and understanding of the challenges in planning and implementing the National Determined Contributions (NDCs). The NDC Regional Dialogue convenes countries from the same region to share their approaches and experiences with NDC planning and implementation activities. These dialogues are also an opportunity to bring together governments from the regions with donors and support institutions.

Up until now, a total of 16 NDC Regional Dialogues have been held since 2015 in most regions of the world, including Latin America, Africa, Pacific, and Eurasia, reaching over 1500 participants from more than 150 governments. For 2016-2018, the objectives of the dialogues are:

- Exchange national experiences and views related to NDC implementation planning, including linkages to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) and other planning processes, as well as opportunities to advance gender equality;

- Identify opportunities for translating NDCs into concrete actions (in particular in the energy sector) to contribute to NDC goals;

- Discuss finance considerations, including private-sector engagement, in the context of NDC implementation;

- Discuss future steps on NDCs in the context of the Talanoa Dialogue, raising ambition, and long-term development strategies.

The next regional NDC dialogue will take place in the first week of October in Bangkok, Thailand for the Asia region and the second week of October in Castries, St. Lucia for the Caribbean region.


During the latest round of dialogues, it became clear that governments around the world are facing similar challenges as regards NDC implementation under the Paris Agreement. For example, many countries are currently looking into how to best determining institutional arrangements and coordination mechanisms, increasing stakeholder ownership and building capacity, as well as planning for implementation. With regards to funding the NDC implementation activities,  government are working on costing out actions and developing funding strategies, including accessing finance sources and support for action. It appears that there is a clear need for related capacity building support for MRV systems and linking NDC implementation with National Communications (NCs), Biennial Update Reports (BURs), Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) reporting efforts.


About NDCs


NDCs are at the heart of the Paris Agreement and the achievement of these long-term goals. NDCs embody efforts by each country to reduce national emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The Paris Agreement (Article 4, paragraph 2) requires each Party to prepare, communicate and maintain successive NDCs that it intends to achieve. Parties shall pursue domestic mitigation measures, with the aim of achieving the objectives of such contributions.

NDCs are then recorded in the NDC registry which is publicly available and maintained by the secretariat. Modalities and procedures for the operation and use of this public registry are currently being negotiated under the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI), agenda item 6. Until the modalities and procedures of the public NDC registry are finalized, communicated NDCs are registered and available in the interim NDC registry.

Up to this date, there are 172 Parties that have submitted their first NDCs out of 178 Parties that have ratified the Paris Agreement. Under the provisions of the Paris Agreement, Parties will be expected to submit an updated NDC every five years, which will represent a progression beyond the country’s then current NDC to reflect its highest possible ambition.

For more information about NDC Regional Dialogues and other NDC related events, please click here.

Follow Mitigation & Transparency Exchange Facebook page for updates about NDCs.​

  
​An event highlighting the achievements of the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), and experiences and lessons learned by developing countries’ in the preparation of their national reports, national communication (NC) and biennial update report (BUR), was held on May 2, 2018, during the Bonn Climate Change Conference 2018.
24/05/2018 10:40Novita Syaputri24/05/2018 10:4024.05.2018

An event highlighting the achievements of the Consultative Group of Experts (CGE), and experiences and lessons learned by developing countries’ in the preparation of their national reports, national communication (NC) and biennial update report (BUR), was held on May 2, 2018, during the Bonn Climate Change Conference 2018.

The CGE Chair, Mr. Thiago de Araujo Mendes, presented key achievements and activities of the CGE in assisting developing countries in implementing the existing measurement, reporting, and verification (MRV) arrangements under the Convention from 2014 to 2017. The CGE, one of the oldest expert groups and key technical support element under the Convention, has updated 4 sets of training materials, developed a technical tool and training programme for experts to support the technical analysis of the BURs; organized 11 regional hands-on training workshops where a total of 443 national experts were trained; and held 16 webinars that reached 728 participants. The CGE also has its own digital platform to share every activity called CGE e-Network.
The Chair noted that there is still great need to enhance national capacities of developing countries to effectively participate in the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention and get ready for the enhanced transparency framework under the Paris Agreement, with a focus on putting in place sustainable institutional arrangements.
 
Representatives from Tuvalu, Georgia, Jordan, and Viet Nam shared their experiences and lessons learned in the preparation of their national reports.  They also outlined some of the key next steps identified in the preparation of the next national reports.
 
8_1.jpg
(L-R) Ms. Jihye Choi and Mr. William Kojo Agyemang-Bonsu, UNFCCC secretariat; Mr. Thiago de Araujo Mendes, The CGE Chair; Ms. Litiana Talake, Tuvalu; Ms. Dina Kisbi, Jordan; Mr. Kakhaberi Mdivani, Georgia; Ms. Ngoc Tran, Viet Nam.

Ms. Litiana Talake, a representative from Tuvalu, presented that one of the key challenges identified in preparing NCs and BURs was a limited or lack of accurate and reliable data across all sectors. To overcome such challenge, Tuvalu developed a centralized information management system, and promoted information and knowledge sharing amongst stakeholders involved in climate change adaptation and mitigation. They intend to use their NC as the basis for policy development for climate change.

Mr. Kakhaberi Mdivani, a representative from Georgia, highlighted that the absence of legal framework for climate related data management and limited access to the data necessary for higher tier methods emerged as a key challenge for Georgia. As the next steps, Georgia is going to switch to the 2006 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Guidelines for its BUR. Further, Georgia will strengthen dialogue with the team of technical experts (TTE) members since it was very helpful to share ideas as well as to have inputs from them that can help improve the quality of the subsequent reports.
Ms. Dina Kisbi, a representative from Jordan, provided an overview of the institutional arrangements for reporting, technical and capacity-building needs; and outcomes of the technical analysis of its BUR. In addition, she highlighted several new aspects that were introduced to prepare its first BUR. This included collaboration with non-governmental organizations and the switch to the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. She highlighted that a national MRV system will be established to support reporting by 2020 and the country is in the process of preparing its next BUR and NC.  
Ms. Ngoc Tran, a representative from Viet Nam, identified several challenges for Viet Nam in preparing its national reports, such as lack of understanding of reporting guidelines, standardized process for data collection and quality assurance, and technical capacity and coordination among institutions and experts involved. She highlighted the need to improve institutional arrangements including the set-up of domestic MRV system and noted the need for additional in-country training for preparing the report, and timely and sustainable financial and technical support.
During the ensuing discussion, participants addressed, among others: how to retain technical expertise gained from trainings in national institutions; the role of documentation; and the process of conducting quality control and quality assurance of the data collected. The interactive discussion with the audience led to an emphasis on the need for developing countries to put in place national system to implement MRV arrangements in a sustainable manner, and thereby to encapsulate and build upon the country knowledge and technical capacity.
If you missed the event, you can see the webcast in here.
The presentations are available here.
To check on what they have submitted, you can find it here: National Communications and Biennial Update Reports.
  
Twenty-four million new jobs will be created globally by 2030 if the right policies to promote a greener economy are put in place. Action to achieve the objectives of the Paris Agreement, to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius, will result in sufficient job creation to more than offset job losses of 6 million elsewhere.
18/05/2018 16:58Novita Syaputri18/05/2018 16:5818.05.2018

Twenty-four million new jobs will be created globally by 2030 if the right policies to promote a greener economy are put in place, a new report by the International Labor Organization (ILO) says. Action to achieve the objectives of the Paris Agreement, to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius, will result in sufficient job creation to more than offset job losses of 6 million elsewhere, according to World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with Jobs.

New jobs will be created by adopting sustainable practices in the energy sector, including changes in the energy mix, promoting the use of electric vehicles and improving the energy efficiency of buildings. Ecosystem services - including air and water purification soil renewal and fertilization, pest control, pollination and protection against extreme weather conditions - sustain, among others, farming, fishing, forestry and tourism activities, which employ 1.2 billion workers.

At the regional level, there will be net job creation in the Americas, Asia and the Pacific and Europe, representing some 3 million, 14 million and 2 million jobs respectively, resulting from measures taken in the production and use of energy. In contrast, there could be net job losses in the Middle East (-0.48 per cent) and Africa (-0.04 per cent) if current trends continue, due to the dependence of these regions on fossil fuel and mining, respectively.

There are also other key findings from the report. For example, transitioning towards a ‘circular economy’ which includes activities like recycling, repair, rent and remanufacture - replacing the traditional economic model of “extracting, making, using and disposing” will create 6 million jobs. Renewables-based electricity will create 2.5 million jobs, offsetting some 400,000 jobs lost in fossil fuel-based electricity generation. Although most sectors of the economy will benefit from net job creation, petroleum extraction and petroleum refining show losses of 1 million or more jobs.
The report calls on countries to take urgent action to train workers in the skills needed for the transition to a greener economy, and provide them with social protection that facilitates the transition to new jobs, contributes to preventing poverty and reduces the vulnerability of households and communities.
“Policy changes in these regions could offset the anticipated job losses or their negative impact. Low- and some middle- income countries still need support to develop data collection, and adopt and finance strategies towards a just transition to an environmentally sustainable economy and society that includes everyone from all groups of society,” says Catherine Saget, the lead author of the report.
Read the complete article here.
  
In order to provide support to the countries in the process of moving toward implementation of their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), the Regional Dialogue on NDC for Eastern Europe, Caucasus, and Central Asia will be held in Tbilisi, Georgia on 21-23 May 2018.
17/05/2018 15:28Novita Syaputri17/05/2018 15:2817.05.2018

In order to provide support to the countries in the process of moving toward implementation of their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), the Regional Dialogue on NDC for Eastern Europe, Caucasus, and Central Asia will be held in Tbilisi, Georgia on 21-23 May 2018. The dialogue is co-organized by the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Secretariat; hosted by the Government of Georgia; and supported by the European Union and the Governments of Germany, Japan, and Norway. Further information about NDC Regional Dialogue 2018 can be found here and the agenda in here.

The dialogue will gather government representatives from Eastern Europe, the Caucasus region, and Central Asia (including from ministries of environment, planning, finance, and energy), as well as representatives of international organizations and other institutions involved in NDC implementation.
During the three days meeting, the dialogue will seek to accomplish several objectives:
1. Exchange national experiences and views related to NDC implementation planning, including linkages to Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) and other planning processes, as well as opportunities to advance gender equality;
2. Identify opportunities for translating NDCs into concrete actions (in the energy sector in particular) to contribute to NDC goals;
3. Discuss finance considerations, including private-sector engagement, in the context of NDC implementation; and
4. Discuss future steps on NDCs in the context of the Talanoa Dialogue, raising ambition, and long-term development strategies.


Flags of member states flying at UN Headquarters: Georgia. Photo credit: UN Photo/Loey Felipe


Following an overview of the region’s NDCs, participants will discuss country’s progress on NDC implementation, synergies between NDCs and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as the opportunities to incorporate NDC into national planning. Special focus will be put on how to translate NDCs into action, with a view to action in the energy sector; financing and private sector engagement; as well as integrating gender equality and women’s empowerment into national climate change planning and policy. Following the successful Talanoa Dialogue that was held during the Climate Change Conference in May in Bonn, the meeting will also turn to the ideas of the Talanoa Dialogue. It will further look at long-term and low-emission development strategies as tools to transform economies and achieve long-term visions.
 
NDC Regional Dialogue’s background
In 2015, the UNFCCC Secretariat together with the UNDP and other organizations launched a series of Regional Dialogues on INDCs to provide support to the countries and advance the Paris Agreement process. Since countries ratified the Paris Agreement, the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) turned into NDCs; the NDC Regional Dialogues now serves to support countries in implementing their NDCs. To date, the Regional Dialogues have convened over 2,000 participants from 150 developing countries through global workshops and regional dialogues. The last NDC Regional Dialogue was held on March 2018 in Fiji in consultations with the Regional Pacific NDC Hub which provided an opportunity for Pacific Island countries to share experiences and needs on the implementation of their NDCs. Click here for more information and presentations regarding this Regional Pacific NDC Dialogue and NDC Hub.
 
To stay updated on NDC events, please follow the Mitigation and Transparency Exchange Facebook page.
  
In conjunction with the Bonn Climate Change Conference 2018, experts from around the world gathered in Bonn to champion the benefits of circular economies at the Technical Expert Meetings on Mitigation (TEMs-M).
17/05/2018 13:23Novita Syaputri17/05/2018 13:2317.05.2018

In conjunction with the Bonn Climate Change Conference 2018, experts from around the world gathered in Bonn to champion the benefits of circular economies.

Having come a long way from its theoretical inception in the 1960s, circular economies are now being implemented with ever greater success by front-running government ministries, businesses, NGOs and international organisations.
Experts convened to share their innovative approaches, lessons learned and tangible benefits for the climate and sustainable development. Aligned with the year-long Talanoa Dialogue around ambition before and after 2020, the expert gathering helped to boost climate action before 2020 in concrete terms.
This meeting plays a crucial role to boost climate action before 2020 by informing and inspiring countries about the currently available solutions and best practices on waste-to-energy and supply chain re-design”, said Mr. Emmanuel Dlamini, chair of the subsidiary body for implementation in his opening remarks.
He asked the experts and participants to ponder ways forward and necessary actions to be taken by countries, cities, businesses, and organizations to replicate and upscale identified innovative approaches.
A “circular economy” is an alternative to a traditional linear economy (make, use and dispose). It aims to use resources as long as possible, extract the maximum value from them and recover and regenerate materials at the end.
Waste-to-energy and supply chain redesign solutions are integral parts to achieving circular economies and the associated triple benefits: economic, environmental and employment.   
As part of the so-called Technical Expert Meetings on Mitigation (TEMs-M), experts eagerly engaged and showcased their achievements in implementing circular economies.
tems 2.jpg
TEMs Mitigation: Session III – Replicating and upscaling innovations and best practices on waste-to-energy and circular economy, including elements of supply chain redesign. 
 
Waste-to-energy: Best practices from the government and technological innovators
A number of experts presented innovative technologies for waste-to-energy solutions and associated challenges.
Mr. Le Viet Vinh from Viet Hien Coffee Processing Machinery, Vietnam explained the pyrolysis-flox technology, which is very useful and efficient for turning agricultural waste (such as rice husks, coffee husks, maize spindles, and cashew shells) into clean heat energy and biochar, a natural soil enhancer.
Mr. Heinz J. Sturm from International Clean Energy Partnership Foundation Climate Technology Center (ICEPS CTC) Bonn, presented an emerging hydrogen fuel cell technology, in which biomass waste can be used to generate hydrogen fuel for various uses.
Ms. María José Gonzalez from Biovalor Project, Uruguay gave an example from two pilot projects of how slaughterhouse’s waste from 500 cows is powering a biogas plant to meet the energy demand of the nearby community. However, technological innovation also comes with some barriers. “One of the barriers is that this kind of project has high investment risks for the size of our producers. Also, there is still a lack of knowledge about technologies,” she said.
Ms. Jenitha Badul, a representative from Department of Environmental Affairs, South Africa explained that “…the initial investments for waste-to-energy solutions are quite high, but the return is fast. A balanced package of supportive legal framework, political leadership and an incubation fund for start-ups through public and private investment could spur such solutions.”
Re-designing supply chain to achieve circularity
Ms. Ines dos Santos Costa from Ministry of Environment Portugal told the gathering of the ministry’s important public outreach initiative on circular economies. “We are focusing on raising awareness to inspire the public and companies about the circularity. Our means are a  website, roadshows and workshops to showcase the best examples of companies, products, and projects in implementing a circular economy. We also have a funding program to provide start-up investment and support”.
It is also fascinating to see what the private sector is doing for circular economies and how it is working with the governments for circular economy to be adopted in the supply chain. As cited by Mr. Stefan Henningsson from WWF Sweden, Agriprotein in South Africa is reusing organic waste protein to replace fish and soy meal in animal feedstock. In doing so, they reduced emissions by 23 million tons of CO2 per year by 2014. This initiative prevents burden on marine life, land use, transport and landfill, and CO2 are saved in feedstock sourcing. Another initiative comes from Bamboo Winding Pipelines in China where bamboo is used to replace nonrenewable material, such as steel, concrete, and plastic. Thus, 63 million tons of CO2 avoided.
Ms. Preeti Srivasta, Director Corporate Climate Action of Ecofys said, “Industries are creating circular economy initiatives right now. But the private sector by itself will not be able to make a systemic change for the circular economy. Therefore, it is important to start engage with the suppliers and redesigning the supply chain.”
Enhanced innovation and collaboration needed to upscale and replicate identified solutions
Sira Saccani from Climate-KIC suggested to harness the potential of digital innovation in fostering circular economy activities. She gave an example of Pendula Resource Management from Germany, in which they enable companies and recyclers to easily organize, track, and then review recycling operations online using real-time data and analytics.
Mr. Alois P. Mhlanga from United Nations Industrial Development Organization said “There is a huge potential for innovation and business models to be scaled up. It is critical to create easy access to financing for entrepreneurs and innovation start-ups, coupled with capacity building support.”
Minister Inia Seruiratu, the high-level champion said, “The multi-stakeholders’ cooperation is needed to unlock high mitigation potential opportunities, including sustainable development benefits. The enhanced partnership and engagement amongst policy makers, industries, cities, regional and local organizations, civil societies can create an inclusive business model for waste-to-energy and supply chain redesign.”
He also added that the Technical Expert Meetings are very important vehicles to take a deep dive into the specific policies and opportunities with high mitigation potential that are both actionable in the short-term and align with the long-term goals of Paris Agreement.
TEMs-M Background
This event was held as part the technical examination process on mitigation (TEP-M), mandated by governments at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in 2013. In the mandate, governments set the aim of exploring high-potential mitigation policies, practices and technologies with significant sustainable development co-benefits that could increase the mitigation ambition of pre-2020 climate action. This process was further specified at COP 20.
Keep following our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for the insights and snapshots of the meetings.
If you missed the event, more information can be obtained here.
  
An event showcasing success stories of measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) and the transparency of action and support was held on 08 May 2018, during the 48th session of the Subsidiary Bodies. The expert panel comprised of Deutsche Post DHL Group, Deutsche Bahn, the government of Singapore, the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the Global Support Programme (GSP), and was moderated by Mr. William Agyemang-Bonsu from the UNFCCC secretariat.
16/05/2018 15:40Novita Syaputri16/05/2018 15:4016.05.2018

An event showcasing success stories of measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) and the transparency of action and support was held on 08 May 2018, during the 48th session of the Subsidiary Bodies here in Bonn. The expert panel comprised of Deutsche Post DHL Group, Deutsche Bahn, the government of Singapore, the Global Environment Facility (GEF), and the Global Support Programme (GSP). The event was moderated by Mr. William Agyemang-Bonsu from the UNFCCC secretariat. It was well-attended and generated keen interest from the audience.

Mr. Björn Hannappel from the Deutsche Post DHL Group and Mr. Constantin Zerger from Deutsche Bahn (DB) shared their experiences and best practices in adopting climate change goals/targets and tracking it using innovative approaches. They are currently implementing more environmentally friendly corporate strategies to reduce GHG emissions with a long-term goal of reaching zero net emissions.  A key message shared by both Björn and Constantin was the need to make a good business case for reducing emissions with the understanding that this may be easier and more effective to carry out in some parts of the business process over others, and that some emission reduction initiatives may not have a strong business case but may be good to do anyway because they support the corporate long-term goal of reaching zero emissions. Government could play a defining role in coordinating the data collection essential for accounting GHG emissions, e.g. in supporting global reporting standards. Government policies and incentives could enhance innovation and commitment to climate change mitigation action in the private sector.
Mr. Santhosh Manivannan of the government of Singapore shared his country’s experience in preparing information and reporting via their National Communications (NCs) and Biennial Update Reports (BURs). Preparing NCs and BURs has taught Singapore that the best way is to learn by doing recognizing that there will be challenges in improving the reporting over time. Santhosh highlighted that it would be useful if there were sustainable institutional arrangements and the national reports are relevant for domestic purposes too thereby ensuring political buy-in at national level. He also highlighted that it takes a ‘’whole of government’’ effort to collect information from various stakeholders and use it to prepare reports.
The representative of the GEF, Ms. Milena Gonzalez Vasquez and Mr. Damiano Borgogno from GSP presented support initiatives focused on the enhancement of developing countries national capacity to effectively participate in the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention. To add to that, they also mentioned their preparedness to support implementation of the transparency framework under the Paris Agreement.
MRV.JPG 
Photo (L-R):  Damiano Borgogno (UNDP GSP), Milena Gonzalez Vasquez (the GEF), William Agyemang-Bonsu (UNFCCC secretariat), Santhosh Manivannan (Singapore), Constantin Zerger (Deutsche Bahn), Björn Hannappel (GoGreen Deutsche Post DHL Group).
 
 
The UNDP GSP has supported the preparation of approximately 332 NCs and 56 BURs to date. Some key points highlighted by UNDP GSP include the following: MRV is a great entry point for promoting gender-based climate actions; peer-to-peer collaboration between development countries is an effective tool to motivate, engage and enhance MRV arrangements; there is a strong case to linking the MRV and transparency framework into the broader national development agenda.
Since the establishment of the Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency, 22 projects have been approved by the GEF to a total of US$28.5 million (20 national projects; including 6 least developed countries; 2 small island states and 2 global projects viz. the Global Coordination Platform and Global AFOLU).
Both the GSP and GEF intimated that the degree to which support opportunities are effectively utilized can be enhanced by a high degree of political commitment from policy-makers and government officials. In addition, the national level actions on MRV could further catalyze voluntary action from the private sector to help curb climate change impacts as shown by Deutsche Post DHL Group and Deutsche Bahn.
Keep following our Facebook page Mitigation & Transparency Exchange for more insights and snapshots.
If you missed the event, more information can be obtained here and the webcast is available here.
  
In-forum training workshop on the use of economic modelling tools related to the areas of the work programme
A workshop to discuss the use of economic modelling tools related to the areas of the work programme is being held during the Bonn Climate Change Conference on the 30th of April and 1st of May 2018.
26/04/2018 11:43Novita Syaputri26/04/2018 11:4326.04.2018

On the 30th of April and 1st of May 2018 there will be a workshop held during the Bonn Climate Change Conference to discuss the use of economic modelling tools related to the areas of the work programme. During the 47th Sessions of the UNFCCC Subsidiary Bodies (SB 47), Parties agreed that the two-days training workshop is to be organized under the guidance of the Chairs of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI) and the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA), that will include experts invited from both developing and developed countries, as well as from intergovernmental and international organizations. Therefore, this in-forum training workshop is arranged as a mandated event for the participants of the Bonn Climate Conference.

There are four main sessions throughout the two-days training workshop: "Introduction and overview: modelling tools and their application on the assessment of the impacts of response measures", "Needs and/or opportunities for modelling tools to assess the impacts of response measures and its potential gaps", "Showcasing existing methodologies and case studies", and "Showcasing existing programmes on the use of modelling tools to assess the impacts of climate policies". The workshop is open for participation of Parties, representatives of relevant bodies established under the Convention, experts, youth, practitioners and stakeholders.
To stay updated on Bonn Climate Change Conference events, please follow the Mitigation and Transparency Exchange Facebook page.
Further information about the workshop, you can click here for the 30th of April agenda and here for the 1st of May.
  
UN Climate Change is launching today a webinar series to support developing nations in reporting on their efforts to tackle climate change.

The series aims to provide a platform for practitioners to focus in-depth on specific methods or tools, across all the themes, namely, greenhouse gas inventory, mitigation, vulnerability and adaptation, and support.
06/04/2018 14:06No presence informationBhava Dhungana06/04/2018 14:0606.04.2018

UN Climate Change is launching today a webinar series to support developing nations in reporting on their efforts to tackle climate change.

The series aims to provide a platform for practitioners to focus in-depth on specific methods or tools, across all the themes, namely, greenhouse gas inventory, mitigation, vulnerability and adaptation, and support.
 
The webinar series will focus on:
  • How a country can better implement the current Measurement, Reporting and Verification (MRV) arrangements under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)
  • How a country can better showcase its climate action on mitigation and adaptation through national communications and biennial update reports
  • Methodologies used and tools available
  • Lessons learned and good practices from developing countries.
The webinars, 45-60 minutes in duration, will be held in the first and third week of each month. They will be offered in English, Spanish and French, as resources permit.
The kick-off webinar on “Introduction to MRV process and cross-cutting issues” will start at 3 pm (CET) on 5 April 2018. The topics covered will include:
  • Introduction to the 2018 webinar series
  • Overview of the MRV process for developing countries
  • Explanation of the institutional arrangements that are needed for MRV systems
  • Process for gender mainstreaming when preparing national reports.
The webinar series is organized by the Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE), an expert group that provides technical assistance and advice to developing countries to participate effectively in the MRV arrangements under the UNFCCC.
Register here.
Subsequent sessions will be programmed based on the emerging interests and priorities of the countries.
Stay in touch
For further information on the CGE’s training materials and tools, click here.
To stay updated on this webinar series, “like” the Mitigation and Transparency Exchange Facebook page.
  
The third cycle of International Assessment and Review was launched in March 2018.  Since 2014, the trust among all Parties has been built through the implementation of the monitoring reporting and verification system.  Wealth of experience was gained by climate change experts and Parties by reviewing and multilaterally assessing national reports of developed Parties and by analysing and facilitatively sharing views on the national reports of developing Parties.  The practice and lessons learned through these processes informs the development of the Transparency Framework under the Paris Agreement.
21/03/2018 11:31No presence informationBhava Dhungana21/03/2018 11:3121.03.2018

The third cycle of International Assessment and Review was launched in March 2018.  Since 2014, the trust among all Parties has been built through the implementation of the monitoring reporting and verification system.  Wealth of experience was gained by climate change experts and Parties by reviewing and multilaterally assessing national reports of developed Parties and by analysing and facilitatively sharing views on the national reports of developing Parties.  The practice and lessons learned through these processes informs the development of the Transparency Framework under the Paris Agreement.
At the beginning of this year most developed countries submitted their third biennial reports and seventh national communications showcasing among other things:
·         Actions related to climate change;
·         Progress countries are making to achieve its target; and
·         Support provided to developing countries.
Now it is time for expert review teams to review these reports and verify Parties’ progress made.
In order to get ready, the lead reviewers (LRs) of Biennial Reports and National Communications met in Bonn (28 February – 1 March 2018). The meeting aimed to facilitate the work of the LRs in fulfilling their task of ensuring consistency of reviews across Parties under review. 64 experts attended the meeting, 33 from non-Annex I Parties and 31 were from Annex I Parties. During the meeting experts shared their experiences when reviewing Parties and agreed on approaches for the upcoming reviews. LRs enjoyed a lot the practical exercises, which allow them to mock the review activities.
The submissions from 26 Parties will be reviewed in March–June 2018. The European Union and the Netherlands were the first two Parties to receive expert review teams followed by Germany and the Czech Republic. In the following months expert review teams will go to the capitals of Australia, Canada, France, Hungary and Japan to assess the reported information, meet with country experts and share experiences, success stories and challenges when implementing the commitment of the UNFCCC.
The reviews are followed by the Multilateral Assessment sessions, scheduled for SBI sessions in December 2018, June and December 2019.
  
The 3rd Pacific Regional Dialogue on Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and consultations on the Regional Pacific NDC Hub was held from 12-14th March in Suva, Fiji. The Dialogue provided an opportunity for Pacific Island Countries to share experiences and needs on the implementation of their NDCs. Countries, partners, regional organisations, private sector and civil society organisations were present to provide inputs to the establishment of the Regional Pacific NDC Hub – a regional arm of the NDC Partnership. 
20/03/2018 15:07No presence informationBhava Dhungana20/03/2018 15:0720.03.2018

The 3rd Pacific Regional Dialogue on Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and consultations on the Regional Pacific NDC Hub was held from 12-14th March in Suva, Fiji. The Dialogue provided an opportunity for Pacific Island Countries to share experiences and needs on the implementation of their NDCs. Countries, partners, regional organisations, private sector and civil society organisations were present to provide inputs to the establishment of the Regional Pacific NDC Hub – a regional arm of the NDC Partnership. 
 
The meeting supported countries in the process of implementation and enhancement of their NDCs. During the three days sessions, participants shared experiences and discussed in-depth the exchange of national experiences and views related to NDC implementation planning. Different topics were addressed, such as linkages to SDG processes, opportunities to advance gender equality, future steps on NDC’s enhancement and revision, and linkages to long-term strategies. Participants further identified concrete opportunities for action in translating NDCs into actionable projects, in particular in the energy sector. The discussion on how to contribute to NDC goals and its implementation went through linkages with sectoral planning and the access to and availability of finance including private-sector engagement.
 
A key element from the meeting for Pacific Island states was to achieve agreement on the Regional Pacific NDC Hub in terms of services provided, funding mechanism, structure, and governance. Inputs to the draft design document based on country priorities and needs, and agreement on next steps were also very important. Two of consensual decisions was that the Regional Pacific NDC Hub should provide assistance the area of NDC enhancement and the inclusion of adaptation if requested by the countries. Due to the need for increased resilience across all sectors, the participants also suggested that the Regional Pacific NDC Hub should provide guidance on synergies between mitigation & resilience and the adaptation co-benefits of mitigation action.
 
  
The tenth round of technical analysis was convened in Bonn, Germany, from 5 to 9 March 2018. Two teams of technical experts (TTE) conducted the technical analysis of five second BURs (Lebanon, Republic of Korea, South Africa, Thailand and Vietnam) and one first BUR (Jordan).
13/03/2018 09:56No presence informationBhava Dhungana13/03/2018 09:5613.03.2018

The tenth round of technical analysis was convened in Bonn, Germany, from 5 to 9 March 2018. Two teams of technical experts (TTE) conducted the technical analysis of five second BURs (Lebanon, Republic of Korea, South Africa, Thailand and Vietnam) and one first BUR (Jordan). During the initial remarks, the secretariat reiterated the importance of the current MRV arrangements for developing countries, as a critical input to the ongoing negotiations on the Modalities, Procedures and Guidelines for the transparency framework under the Paris agreement. Further, based on the positive feedback received from Parties, the secretariat underscored the importance of the technical analysis process to Parties, in identifying their prioritized capacity-building needs and demonstrating to the world, the results achieved from their mitigation actions, hence the important role of experts in conducting technical analyses.

Over the next nine months, the TTEs, in consultation with the Parties, will prepare the summary reports for each of those Parties analysed. The information will capture the findings of the technical analysis, including capacity building needs, aimed at enhancing the capacity of Parties to facilitate transparent reporting of information reported in their BURs. Once published on the secretariat’s website, these summary reports will serve as input to the facilitative sharing of views process for these Parties.
 
Since the launch of the ICA process in 2015, Parties have submitted 54 reports, including 39 and 15 first and second BURs respectively. To date, the secretariat has composed 21 TTE, consisting of 138 experts, who have analysed 52 BURs. To date, 41 of the summary reports have been published on the UNFCCC website, additional information is available here:
  
As part of the Paris Agreement, Parties to the UNFCCC agreed to establish a Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT) to strengthen the institutional and technical capacities of developing countries to meet the enhanced transparency requirements of the Paris Agreement.
06/12/2017 11:48No presence informationMarlan Pillay13/12/2017 16:1106.12.2017
In order to strengthen the institutional and technical capacities of developing countries to meet the transparency requirements of the Paris Agreement, countries agreed to establish a Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (CBIT). The GEF was requested to support the establishment and operation of the CBIT, including through voluntary contributions to support developing countries during GEF-6 (2014- 2018) and future replenishment cycles.
The CBIT has three aims:
1.       Strengthen national institutions for transparency-related activities in line with national priorities
2.       Provide relevant tools, training and assistance for meeting the provisions stipulated in Article 13 of the Agreement Assist in the improvement of transparency over time
3.       Assist in the improvement of transparency over time
More information on the CBIT can be found here:
·         Video on the CBIT
·         Information leaflet on CBIT
All developing country Parties have access to the CBIT upon request. A list of projects approved under the CBIT can be found here: Projects under CBIT

 

  
An event showcasing initiatives to support measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) and the transparency of action and support was held on November 13, 2017, during the twenty-third Conference of Parties.
06/12/2017 11:02No presence informationMarlan Pillay06/12/2017 12:2906.12.2017

An event showcasing initiatives to support measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) and the transparency of action and support was held on November 13, 2017, during the twenty-third Conference of Parties.
The expert panel – the Global Environment Facility (GEF); the UNDP/UN Environment Global Support Programme (GSP); and the Initiative for Climate Action Transparency (ICAT-UNEP-DTU) presented support initiatives focused on the enhancement of developing countries’ national capacity to effectively participate in the existing MRV arrangements under the Convention, as well as their preparations to implement the modalities, procedures and guidelines of the transparency framework under the Paris Agreement. A representative from the National Council for Climate Change and the Clean Development Mechanism of the Dominican Republic also provided their experience and lessons learned in mobilizing and accessing necessary support in a timely manner.
 
Photo: L-R: Karen Hedeman Lluberes (Dominican Republic); John Christensen (Director of UNEP DTU Partnership); Monica Echegoyen (ICAT Coordinator); Dominique Revet (UNFCCC secretariat); Damiano Borgogno (UNDP GSP); Milena Gonzalez Vasquez (the GEF).
The event was moderated by the UNFCCC secretariat. It was well-attended and generated interest and views from the audience during an interactive Question and Answer session.
Overall, the panel discussion reinforced the idea that effective participation in the current MRV arrangements under the Convention and transparency framework under the Paris Agreement requires long-term efforts for capacity-building support in developing countries and a systemic approach to build robust and sustainable national MRV systems. The panelists highlighted the need to ensure that the information prepared and submitted in national reports is relevant to national development process by informing relevant policies, plans and thus gaining political buy-in at national level. The degree to which support opportunities are effectively utilized can be enhanced by a high degree of political commitment from policy-makers and government officials.
The representatives of support providers outlined their initiatives available to developing countries to strengthen or establish national MRV systems. The financial, technical and capacity-building support has been provided in areas of, inter alia, developing legal frameworks and instruments; enhancing or consolidating existing institutional arrangements; improving data collection and management; and producing high quality national communications and biennial update reports (also known as BURs).
The Dominican Republic shared their experience and lessons learned in conducting a technical, institutional and legal analysis to examine the current situation and identify the gaps in regards to the main elements that make up a national MRV/Transparency System that is compatible with national data management practices as well as with reporting requirements to the UNFCCC. Their aim is to produce a mapping of existing relevant institutions that will play a role in the institutional arrangement to implement the MRV system; and to create a road map detailing the activities that need to be implemented for obtaining reliable and regular information on GHG emissions and reductions.
The interactive discussion with the audience led to an emphasis on the need for developing countries to encapsulate the knowledge and experience gained from the MRV process, as well as showcase their efforts and progress made.
The webcast of the side-event is available here.
The presentations are available here.
  
The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE) organized a side-event on 9 November 2017 on the margins of COP 23 to showcase the key achievements of the group and success stories of developing countries on the preparation of the national communications (NCs) and biennial update reports (BURs).
06/12/2017 10:59No presence informationMarlan Pillay06/12/2017 12:3006.12.2017

​The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE) organized a side-event on 9 November 2017 on the margins of COP 23 to showcase the key achievements of the group and success stories of developing countries on the preparation of the national communications (NCs) and biennial update reports (BURs). The panel of speakers consisted of Mr. Stephen King’uyu, the CGE member from Kenya, Ms. Emma Rachmawaty from Indonesia, and Ms. Mariana Kaspzyk from Uruguay. Mr. William Agyemang-Bonsu from the secretariat moderated the event.

Mr. King’uyu outlined the key objectives of the group, its strategic priorities, and its key activities in 2017. The key outputs of the CGE included updated training materials on:
  1. Reporting of mitigation actions and their effects in BURs;
  2. National greenhouse gas inventories;
  3. Reporting information on finance, technology transfer and capacity-building needs and support received;
The CGE also prepared a “Technical Tool to Facilitate Parties Prepare for and Participate in The International Consultation and Analysis”;
Mr. King’uyu also informed that in addition to the updated training materials, the CGE had also conducted two regional hands-on training workshops on the preparation of mitigation action and reporting on them in national communications (NCs) and biennial update reports (BURs), and 7 webinars, which is complemented by the online e-learning courses on the topics of GHG inventories, mitigation assessment and vulnerability and adaptation assessment.
Two countries, Indonesia and Uruguay, presented their success stories regarding the preparation and submission of NCs and BURs.
Ms.Rachmawaty from Indonesia shared how the process of preparing the national reports are being improved based on the lessons learned and feedback from the participation in the facilitative sharing of views (FSV). She noted that work on NC and BURs could improve capacity of national and sub-national experts, promote stakeholder engagement and strengthen institutional arrangements. She highlighted a few challenges that needs to be overcome.  These relate to data availability and collection, use of IPCC 2006 guidelines, assessing impacts of mitigation actions, and enhancing and maintaining on a continuous basis appropriate institutional arrangements.  In terms of next steps, she highlight two concrete actions: incorporating baseline and target under its NDC into national development plan.
In addition to the views from Indonesia, Ms. Kasprzyk shared the success stories of Uruguay. Uruguay had first initiated the process of preparation of the NCs in 1994, and since then it has been maintained on a continuous basis. This resulted in having in place sound institutional arrangements with permanent team in the Climate Change Division supported by specific sectoral working groups.  This, in turn, enable Uruguay to continuously and actively engage in the MRV process.  Till date, Uruguay has already completed 4 rounds of NCs and the first BUR.  The preparation of the fifth NC is underway and is about to submit second BUR.  These reports were noted to be help at the national level, among other things, in raising awareness on climate change and also as a tool for policy-making.
This animation explains the benefits of the measurement, reporting and verification
The webcast of the side-event is available here (starting at 8:50)
The presentations are available here.
  
The CGE, in 2017, updated several of its training materials with a view to ensuring that developing country Parties have the latest information and technical guidance available to effectively participate in the measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) process, including the preparation of BURs and the international consultation and analysis (ICA) process.
06/12/2017 10:56No presence informationMarlan Pillay06/12/2017 12:3006.12.2017

The CGE, in 2017, updated several of its training materials with a view to ensuring that developing country Parties have the latest information and technical guidance available to effectively participate in the measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) process, including the preparation of BURs and the international consultation and analysis (ICA) process.
The updated training materials on reporting information on GHG inventories, mitigation actions, and support needed and received provide the context for reporting, and explanation of the different reporting provisions through concrete examples and templates. The training materials provide guidance on how to ensure the completeness of information reported, examples and key considerations to take into account, templates for providing such information and questions to guide the process when preparing and finalizing the information to be reported.
In additional, the CGE also prepared a technical tool at assist developing country Parties prepare for and participate in the technical analysis of their BURs and the facilitative sharing of views.
  
To foster transparency, trust and confidence and promote climate action Parties to the UNFCCC put in place arrangements for measurement, reporting and verification (MRV). The transparency mechanism under the UNFCCC process uses a language which is full of acronyms, and this video explains some of them.
29/08/2017 12:14No presence informationBhava Dhungana29/08/2017 12:1829.08.2017

​To foster transparency, trust and confidence and promote climate action Parties to the UNFCCC put in place arrangements for measurement, reporting and verification (MRV). The transparency mechanism under the UNFCCC process uses a language which is full of acronyms, and this video explains some of them.

Find the video here

 

For more information viste the site here

  
Register for the CGE e-learning courses by 1 September 2017! The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from non-Annex I Parties (CGE) has developed online e-learning courses to assist the preparation of national communications.
29/08/2017 12:08No presence informationBhava Dhungana29/08/2017 13:4129.08.2017

​Register for the CGE e-learning courses by 1 September 2017! The Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from non-Annex I Parties (CGE) has developed online e-learning courses to assist the preparation of national communications. The e-courses are free of charge and are open to everyone. Participants have 3 months to complete the course and will receive a certificate upon completion. Please mail any questions to tisu@unfccc.int. Register for the e-courses here>> http://bit.ly/1Ex9GIC

  
A new guidance document for the peer review of GHG inventories for Parties has been created by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) secretariat, with the support of the Global Support Programme (GSP) for National Communications and Biennial Update Reports (GSP).
29/08/2017 11:52No presence informationBhava Dhungana29/08/2017 11:5729.08.2017

​The document aims to serve as a manual for experts to assess the GHG inventory and inventory development process. It describes how to perform a review of national GHG inventory management systems and national GHG inventories for non-Annex I Parties, taking into consideration and ensuring consistency with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines for national GHG inventories, and the Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention (CGE) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) training materials, workbooks, templates on developing sustainable national GHG inventory systems. Parties to the UNFCCC submit information on the implementation of the Convention, including national actions to mitigate and adapt to the climate change as well as inventory of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Developing countries submit this information through national communications every four years and biennial update reports every two years. The greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories form the core of part of these reports.

Read more about it here

  
The Ministry of the Environment of Japan and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) convened, together with the Ministry of Environment, Green Development and Tourism of Mongolia, the “14th Workshop on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories in Asia (WGIA14)” from 26 to 28 July 2016 in Mongolia’s capital city, Ulaanbaatar.
25/08/2016 16:45No presence informationJoseph Peter Ndimu25/08/2016 16:5925.08.2016

The Ministry of the Environment of Japan and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) convened, together with the Ministry of Environment, Green Development and Tourism of Mongolia, the “14th Workshop on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories in Asia (WGIA14)” from 26 to 28 July 2016 in Mongolia’s capital city, Ulaanbaatar. The main purpose of the annual workshop was to  develop and improve national GHG inventories in the Asian region and to enhance cooperative relationships as a means of achieving this.

93 participants attended WGIA14, including government and research institution representatives of thirteen countries (Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao P.D.R., Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Republic of Korea, Thailand and Vietnam), in addition to representatives of the Technical Support Unit of the IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and others.

Mutual learning sessions on GHG inventories were held during the workshop, and discussions took place on themes related to Biennial Update Reports (BURs) and to various activities with co-benefits for GHG inventories/mitigation and related support. In the mutual learning sessions, the following four GHG inventory sectors were taken up – Energy, Industrial Processes, Land Use, Land-Use Change and forestry (LULUCF) and Waste.

For each session, two countries engaged with each other by following up on the Q&A which had taken place over the course of two and a half months preceding the workshop. Experts and government officials in charge of the national inventory from the partnering countries met each other in person at the sessions, clarifying their questions and elaborating on their answers.

Through the mutual learning sessions, specific issues in the four inventory sectors were identified and some solutions were proposed. Common difficulties such as challenges in collecting activity data or achieving completeness in the coverage of sources/sinks, as well as institutional arrangement issues were acknowledged.

Following the mutual learning sessions, the following topics were taken up in the plenary sessions: 1) Updates on the National Communications and BURs from developing country Parties, 2) Institutional Arrangements for National GHG Inventories and BURs, 3) Good Practices in the International Consultation and Analysis (ICA) Process, and 4) Activities with co-benefits for GHG inventories/mitigation and related support.

firewood

Photo credit: Basharat Alam Shah

In Session 1), participants exchanged views on how to interpret UNFCCC decisions, and the practicalities of implementing them. It was acknowledged that the 2006 IPCC Guidelines reflect the latest scientific knowledge, but the transition to using them requires capacity building. In Session 2), the importance of coordinating between institutional arrangements for inventory preparation, mitigation planning and adaptation was highlighted. In Session 3), it was acknowledged that the ICA process contributes to enhancing transparency, and the capacity of countries to improve their GHG inventories, mitigation and emission reduction work, as well as to the next submission of BURs and Nationally Determined Contributions. In Session 4), participants reconfirmed the co-benefits between air pollution control, terrestrial monitoring and the enhancing of GHG inventories. Clarifications were also sought and provided for related support for the improvement of GHG inventories.

 

  
The UNFCCC Secretariat hosted The Africa Regional Workshop on the Building of Sustainable National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Management Systems, and the Use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories
20/05/2016 09:40Roberto Felix22/08/2016 11:3120.05.2016

The UNFCCC Secretariat hosted The Africa Regional Workshop on the Building of Sustainable National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Management Systems, and the Use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories from 14 to 18 March in Maseru, Lesotho. The workshop was organized by the UNFCCC Secretariat in collaboration with the Technical Support Unit of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventories and the Consultative Group of Experts on National Communications from Parties not included in Annex I to the Convention.

 

A total of 57 experts from 41 countries in the region attended the workshop. The participants primarily consisted of government officials involved in the preparation of national GHG inventories, including UNFCCC national focal points.

 

The workshop was the first of its kind from the UNFCCC Secretariat, offering training on the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for non-Annex I Parties. The workshop was organized following the 42nd Subsidiary Body for Implementation acknowledging the request from non-Annex I Parties for further technical support aimed at improving their domestic capacity to facilitate continuity in meeting reporting requirements through, among others, training on the use of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National GHG Inventories, as well as building of sustainable national GHG inventory management systems.

 

Therefore, the workshop emphasized both the importance of establishing a national inventory management system to support the regular development and submission of national GHG gas inventories, and provided hands-on training on the 2006 IPCC guidelines for national GHG inventories, including the IPCC inventory software. 

 

The workshop consisted of six sessions. The first session included a keynote address by the Honorable Minister Selibe Mochoboroane, Minister of Energy and   Meteorology (Lethotho), and the sharing of country experiences by representatives of Benin, South Africa, Swaziland, and Tunisia.

 

The second session focused on the key role of the national GHG inventory management system, including presentations and hands on materials to support the development of a national GHG inventory management system. This session concluded with a group discussion where participants shared their experiences in using the proposed templates.

 

Sessions three through five provided training on the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, including general guidance, reporting, and sectoral guidance. Following an overview of the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, including differences between the Revised 1996 and the 2006 IPCC Guidelines, participants were introduced to the IPCC inventory software and Emission Factor Database. The IPCC 2006 Guidelines were presented by sector —Energy, Industrial Processes and Product Use, Waste, and Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use. For each sector, participants reviewed source/sink categories and methodologies, and completed a hands-on exercise using the IPCC inventory software. Participants then learned how to utilize the IPCC inventory software for compiling various components of a national GHG inventory.

 

The UNFCCC Secretariat is organizing similar workshops for the Latin America and Caribbean, and Asia Pacific and Eastern Europe regions, in June and September 2016, respectively. 

 

Presentations from the workshop are available on the UNFCCC website: http://unfccc.int/national_reports/non-annex_i_natcom/meetings/items/655.php

 

 ​

  
The CGE, has so far in 2016, conducted five thematic webinars, 3 on vulnerability and adaptation assessment, and 2 on mitigation assessment. These webinars are part of the groups its capacity-building initiatives. An additional four webinars are also being planned for 2016.
20/05/2016 09:29Roberto Felix29/08/2016 11:4320.05.2016

The CGE, has so far in 2016, conducted five thematic webinars, 3 on vulnerability and adaptation assessment, and 2 on mitigation assessment. These webinars are part of the groups its capacity-building initiatives.  An additional four webinars are also being planned for 2016.

The topics for the vulnerability and adaptation assessment webinars focused on the framework for assessment, climate change scenarios, and water resources.  The mitigation webinars focused on the key steps to conduct a mitigation assessment, and the key mitigation challenges and barriers faced in the sector of energy supply.

A total of 174 persons participated in the three vulnerability and adaptation assessment webinars and 80 participated in two mitigation assessment webinars.  Participants included national government representatives, researchers, and technical specialists. The webinars allowed participants to learn and engage with experts remotely and to submit questions where experts provided detailed responses immediately. The presentations were also made available online to users.

In the last quarter of 2016, the CGE will organized webinars in in French and Spanish.  


More details will be provided closer to the webinar dates!

  
The U.S. Agency for International Development Low Emissions Asian Development program (USAID LEAD) conducted its fifth and final “Regional Workshop on National GHG Inventory Systems
20/05/2016 09:51Roberto Felix20/05/2016 09:5120.05.2016

Summary for the CGE e-Network website


The U.S. Agency for International Development Low Emissions Asian Development program (USAID LEAD) conducted its fifth and final “Regional Workshop on National GHG Inventory Systems” from May 3-6, 2016 in Hanoi, Viet Nam. Participants consisted of core national GHG inventory staff from the governments and supporting establishments – such as academia and consultancies – of Bangladesh, Cambodia, Malaysia, Nepal, the Philippines, Thailand, and Viet Nam. The express purpose was to lead them through a self-assessment of their latest national GHG inventories in order to identify their strengths and potential targets for improvement.

 

The event’s organizer, Mr. Joshua Forgotson of the USAID LEAD program and ICF International, along with Ms. Marian Van Pelt and Mr. Alexander Lataille, also of ICF International, introduced participants to a tool developed under the auspices of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and USAID called the Inventory Project Progress Indicator, or IPPI tool.

 

The IPPI tool is a spreadsheet that enables countries to assess their national GHG inventories according to the five TACCC principles – Transparency, Accuracy, Consistency, Completeness, and Comparability – plus Institutional Arrangements and Inventory Improvements. In the IPPI tool, each of these principles is evaluated by examining the inventory of interest through the lens of several criteria, the idea being that the inventory that best meets these criteria will be the most transparent, accurate, consistent, complete, and comparable inventory, and therefore the most useful inventory.

 

During the workshop, participants studied each of the criteria, learned how their regional peers met them (or what challenges they faced in trying to meet them), and assessed their own recent national GHG inventories according to the criteria, taking comprehensive notes of their findings along the way. Thus, the participants completed the workshop with hands-on experience in applying a new tool to the evaluation of their inventories.

 

Participants from one country that recently published its BUR 1 efficiently captured the general mood when they said that they wished they had had the tool before they started their BUR 1. In short, participants’ reactions suggested that they found the IPPI tool a valuable way to assess their inventory progress and set improvement targets for their future inventories.

 

Inventory progress, itself, was the subject of USAID LEAD’s four prior workshops on national GHG inventory systems, which the program held beginning in April 2014. The first two sessions introduced participants to the EPA’s National GHG Inventory Systems Template Workbook to help them establish systems to improve their institutional arrangements, methods and data documentation, QA/QC procedures, archiving systems, key category analyses, and inventory improvement planning. The third session introduced participants to the EPA inventory toolkit, a set of tools intended to help national inventory teams implement successful inventory systems. Finally, the penultimate session saw participants examine the differences between the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories and the 1996 version of the same, become familiar with the IPCC inventory software, and network with their regional peers by engaging in group problem-solving using example inventory challenges from the present country inventory teams.

 

Over the course of the two-year training series, participants gained meaningful insights into how to improve their national GHG inventories, and establish the systems that those inventories would depend upon to realize consistent improvement over time. By acquainting themselves with the IPPI tool at the fifth session, participants adopted a new and easy-to-apply method to quantify and describe the improvements they had made to their GHG inventories thanks to their involvement in USAID LEAD’s training series and related capacity building initiatives.

About USAID LEAD

The Low Emissions Asian Development program of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID LEAD) enhances the capacity of non-Annex I countries to prepare high quality national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories by helping compilers develop and implement sustainable national GHG inventory systems. Such systems enable the efficient management of GHG sources and sinks, which helps countries implement programs and policies that balance the cost of emission mitigation with its benefits.

 

Contact Information

For more information, please contact Mr. Joshua Forgotson at joshua.forgotson@icfi.com.

 

Downloads

·         Presentations from the May 3-6 workshop, compiled into a single PPT file, are here.

·         The USEPA National GHG Inventory Systems Template Workbook is here.